Tag Archives: smart leaders

Smart Leaders Know When to Shut Up, When to Listen… Before They Make Stupid Decisions: When to Dial-In, When to Dial-Out…

The world is ever-changing and filled with high risk, uncertainty, crisis, disruptions… and often many leaders are just out of touch with realities. They don’t know what is happening because they don’t listen, they are too busy talking, lecturing, pontificating… Researcher found that most leaders spend 75% of the time talking, and less than 30% listening to what people have to say… According to OpProf; in a rapidly changing world, smart leaders are those who listen to the world around them; and they make better decisions, find more business opportunities, are more successful… than those who continually talk and won’t shut up.

Many leaders insist-persist in dogmatic soliloquy, and often they are unaware that most supposed listeners are uninterested, unengaged, unimpressed… Yammering; that’s what stupid leaders do, they ramble on about everything while most colleagues, employees, customers… just quit listening… On other hand, smart leaders quietly listen to what the world has to say; they listen, learn, and put the lessons learned into action… According to Graham; leaders who get caught-up in their non-stop ‘self-a-thons’ are driven by various subconscious agendas, e.g.; anxiety to prove their self-worth, or need to convince others that they are significant, or desperation to justify themselves as leaders…

In the article Leaders Need to Shut Up, Listen by Mike Myatt writes: Smart leaders are great listeners, they talk less and listen more. They recognize that knowledge and wisdom are not gained by talking but by listening. Being a leader should not mean having license to increase the volume of rhetoric. Rather, smart leaders know there is far more to be gained by surrendering the floor than by dominating it. In this age of instant communication everyone seems to be rush to communicate– what’s on their mind, they fail to realize the value that can be gleaned from listening to the minds of other people…

It’s simply not possible to be a smart leader without being a great communicator, but most leaders fail to understand that the purpose of communication is not the ‘message’ but the ‘engagement’… and that requires listening… Almost universally the smartest person in the room is not the one doing all the talking, but the one who asks a few relevant, engaging questions, and doing most of the listening… In essence, smart leaders are about taking action and that means; more listening and less talking… Great talkers are a dime a dozen but great listeners are a rare commodity

In the article Three Words that Can Save Business by Mark McIntyre writes: Get your head out of the sand and look around your world, and not through the corner-office window but a close-up view of customers, employees, partners… What do you hear? Listen, put your ear to the ground… It’s a recurring theme– companies get blindsided, they are toppled by stealth disruptive forces they could not have seen coming… It’s a great story line but it’s almost never the truth. Instead, many leaders in high-performing companies are deeply addicted with their own success that they are unable to overcome cognitive blinders, they fail to react in a changing world, because they didn’t stop taking, or they stopped looking, or they stopped listening…

In the article Are You Listening or Just Waiting to Talk? by Daniel Newman writes: Is listening a lost art? In a world full of so much to say, it can be very hard to really listen… But if you want to be a smart leader then you must listen… Smart leaders start with the phrase; Are you listening or just waiting to talk? Have you ever caught yourself actively brainstorming, i.e.; carefully planning your next clever response amidst conversation, which means that you are not really listening but rather thinking about your next response…

Some people struggle with being a good enough listener because their mind tends to play chess… Constantly thinking about what is next or what else needs to be done… It’s the act of focus on what a person is saying rather than what you want to say next… When you truly listen you gain more knowledge and a better understanding of other people… It’s simple; just stop waiting to talk and start ‘really’ listening…

In the article Science Of How To Shut Up by Lydia Dishman writes: Humans are programmed to use communication as a vital tool to survive, thrive… But unfortunately humans also have the propensity to pontificate about themselves; even though the ideal conversation to survive, thrive requires– give and take, i.e., being silent half (50%) of the time… According to Peter Bregman; silence is a greatly under-estimated source of power, knowledge, influence… In silence, you hear not only what is being said, but also what is not being said. In silence it’s easier to reach truth, to better understand, to make better decisions… 

Simply talking ad-nausea is counter-productive… and the greatest form of discourse that takes place in a conversation is the give and take, not a lecture, or monologue, or ramblings… When leaders begin to understand that knowledge and insight is only gained by constant listening and not by constant talk… then they have taken an important step to becoming a smart leader, skilled communicator…

When people, at all levels of leadership, get to share opinions, ideas, information… they become much more relevant, engaged, valued… Smart leaders know– when to shut up, when to listen… and more important, they know the correct– ratio of ‘talk to listen’… So, after each conversation ask ‘yourself’: What have you learned? If the answer is: You’ve learned ‘nothing’… then you probably talk too much and not really listened…

More Leaders Need to– Shut Up, Listen, Think: Leadership is About Listening… Know When to Dial-Up, Dial-Down, Dial-Off…

Rule #1: Smart leaders– Shut Up! Listen! Stop Talking! If you’re talking, you’re not listening. This rule also applies to the talking inside your head. If you’re thinking intently about what you want to say, you’re not listening to what is being said…

According to OpProf; some people should simply shut up. In a rapidly changing world, smart leaders find more business opportunities by listening rather than by talking. While other leaders insist-persist in dogmatic soliloquy– and, the audience is disinterested, disengaged, dying for someone to end their misery– no one is listening. Yammering– that’s what stupid leaders do– they yammer-on about something they think is ultimately important but their audience has long since quit listening… To be a smart leader, you need to shut up and listen…

To lead radical transformation in business, organizations… quit talking and start listening. Listen to the people in the know, listen to employees and vendors. Listen to the hard and soft trends. Listen to wise advise in a changing world. Quit thinking you are always right and listen… Those who listen do far more than those who like to hear themselves talk…

According to Graham Seel; I have come to realize that leaders who get caught up in their own non-stop self-a-thons are usually driven by shadier subconscious agenda; the gnawing anxiety to prove themselves; the need to ensure that others know they are significant; the dizzying desperation to justify their leadership role… One of the fundamental hallmarks of strong leadership is self-awareness… The irony is that when a leader is relaxed, focused on others, stops trying so hard to impress people… they become much more effective, inspirational, and respected by others… Be the smart leader– shut up, listen…

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In the article Why Most Leaders Need to Shut Up, Listen by Mike Myatt writes: Great leaders are great listeners, and therefore my message is a simple one– talk less and listen more. The best leaders are proactive, strategic, intuitive listeners… They recognize knowledge and wisdom are not gained by talking, but by listening. Take a moment and reflect back on any great leader who comes to mind… you’ll find they are very adept at reading between the lines. The best leaders possess uncanny ability to understand what is not said, witnessed, heard…

Want to become better leader? Stop talking, start listening. Being a leader should not be viewed as license to increase the volume of rhetoric. Rather astute leaders know there is far more to be gained by surrendering the floor than by dominating it. In this age of instant communication everyone seems to be in such a rush to communicate what’s on their mind, they fail to realize the value of everything that can be gleaned from the minds of others. Show me a leader who doesn’t recognize the value of listening to others and I’ll show you a train-wreck in the making

It’s simply not possible to be a great leader without being a great communicator. This partially accounts for why we don’t encounter great leadership more often. The big miss for most leaders is that they fail to understand that the purpose of communication is not to message, but to engage –  this requires listening. Don’t be fooled into thinking that being heard is more important than hearing. The first rule in communication is to seek understanding before seeking to be understood.

Listen to customers, competitors, peers, subordinates… almost universally, the smartest person in the room is not the one doing all the talking – it’s the person asking the few relevant and engaging questions and doing most of the listening. Leadership is about listening, and action. That said, leaders who act before they understand don’t tend to achieve the outcomes they desire… great talkers are a dime a dozen, but great listeners are a rare breed…

listen hearing-myself-talk

In the article Three Words that Can Save the Business by Mark McIntyre writes: Stop, Look, Listen… Get your head out of the sand of daily operations, look outside. What do you see? Not through the corner-office window but from a perch with a nice view of customers. What are they doing with the product? How satisfied are they with the experience? What alternatives do you see them turning to? Then look to your own imagination and demand that it give you a good look at the worst-case scenario of the future…

Listen, put your ear to the ground: What do you hear? What do Web whispers, blog rumors tell you? Remember that venture capitalist you met last year? Give her a call, ask what got her attention. Take everything you hear seriously… catalog it, then ask colleagues to listen to you… It may often seem like dominating technology companies get blindsided— that they are toppled by stealth disruptive forces they could not have seen coming.

It’s a great story line for Silicon Valley startups, but it’s almost never the truth. Instead, many leaders in high-performing companies are deeply addicted with their success, such that they are unable to overcome their own cognitive blinders… and then they fail to react to market changes, new competitors… whereas, smart leaders are open to new ideas, suggestions… they are always looking, listening, thinking…

 

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In the article Are You Listening or Just Waiting to Talk? by Daniel Newman writes: Is listening a lost art? In a world full of so much to say, it can be so hard to really listen. But if you want to be a leader, you have to realize that you must listen. For leadership is often founded in empathy: It starts with the phrase; Are You Listening or Just Waiting to Talk? Have you ever caught yourself actively brainstorming… carefully planning your eloquent response amidst a conversation… but, ironically you are only comprehending a fraction of the messages because your focus isn’t on the conversation, but rather on your response– Bite your tongue, if necessary, and overcoming the urge to talk, just focus on listening…

Some people struggle with being a good enough listener because their mind tends to play chess. Constantly thinking about what is next or what else needs to be done. However, I have found, without a doubt, that when you want to move a business and relationships forward, there is nothing more compelling than being a great listener. The act of focusing on what the person is saying, rather than what you want to say… allows you to connect and to truly gain understanding of the other person. It’s simple, just– stop waiting to talk, and start ‘really’ listening…

It is simply impossible to become a great leader without being a great communicator: Just note; the sentence doesn’t say become a– great talker, big difference… According to Mike Myatt;  great leaders know when to dial it up, dial it down, dial it off… Simply broadcasting your message ad nauseam will not have the same result as engaging in meaningful conversation, but this assumes that you understand that the greatest form of discourse takes place within a conversation, and not a lecture or monologue. When you reach that point in life where the light bulb goes off, and you begin to understand that knowledge is not gained by flapping lips, but by removing ear wax, you have taken the first step to becoming a skilled communicator and great leader…

According to Mike Figliuolo; if you simply want others around you to think you’re brilliant, there’s an easy and elegant way to do so: Just shut up, listen. When others get to share opinions and ideas, they feel important. You should actively solicit thoughts and listen in an engaged manner. By listening, you can come across as exponentially more brilliant…

Have you found it difficult, at times, to keep your mouth shut? Do you actively monitor your– ‘talking to listening ratio’ in conversations? Do you routinely ask ‘yourself’ — what have I learned from this person (you) in the last 5 minutes? And, when the answer is ‘nothing’: Do you shut up? Remember that the letters in the word ‘listen’ also spell ‘silent’…