Tag Archives: diversity

Delusion of Diversity in Workplaces– Good, Bad, Necessity: More Diversity of Thought is Needed on the Subject of Diversity…

Diversity is often referred to as the key to innovation in business and crucial for companies that want to attract and retain top talent. But is it always the answer? Research has shown diversity alone is harmful for some individuals and organizations. It has been linked to lower revenue, slower decision-making, increased conflict, absenteeism, missed opportunities… Diversity is a technique and not an end in itself; it needs to be balanced against other considerations, e.g.; some business skills are concentrated in– certain locations, certain groups of people, certain cultures…

Narrowness can be a source of strength and cohesion and not a sign of weakness… According to Jonathan Levy; diversity comes in many different shapes and sizes, and differences can include visible and non-visible factors. Whether that’s background, culture, personality, work-style, size, accent, or language. Or personal characteristics like age, disability, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation… With so many differences, how do you manage diversity?

According to Evan Apfelbaum; companies promote diversity in the workplace as moral imperative with ‘bottom line benefits’… But research on its value is mixed: Some studies have found diverse teams– meaning work groups composed of workers from different– backgrounds, races, genders…  promote creativity, nurture critical thinking… and tend to make better and more thoughtful decisions, because they consider a wider range of perspectives…

Other studies indicate diverse teams fuel interpersonal conflicts, reduce cohesion, and slow the pace of learning… The trouble with past research is it assumes only diverse settings are capable of changing how people behave, form impressions, make decisions… According to Dr. Thomas Sowell; nothing so epitomizes the politically correct gullibility as the magic word ‘diversity’, and it’s essentially a fancy buzzword for ‘group quotas’, which is a subjective criteria used to measure hiring practices within many organizations…

In the article Business Case Against Diversity by Tina Vasquez writes: The business case for diversity has become a popularly held belief and the reasoning behind it is very simple: When a corporation’s management and workers are too much alike, they think too much alike and in turn, look at both problems and solutions the same way… By contrast, having a more diverse group in these positions leads to more diversity of solutions, innovations, better governance, and the type of outside-of-the-box thinking so desperately needed in the corporate world… Unfortunately, there is a growing body of evidence that seems to suggest diversity does not deliver as promised… Many companies have reported little to no change in their performance.

Even more unsettling is the idea that making efforts to diversity the workplace is actually creating conflict and toxic work environment. According to Dr. John-Francoise Manzoni, Dr. Paul Strebel, Sandoz, Dr. Jean-Louis Barsoux; diversity may be prize in theory, but the truth is that workers often feel baffled, threatened, or even annoyed by other workers with views and backgrounds very different from their own… According to Professor Katherine Phillips; when organizations bring in people with different cultural, gender, ethnic backgrounds, contrasting experiences; its hoped that they offer different perspectives and opinions about any given issue, e.g.; it’s assume that a black manager and a white manager working together on an issue will come up with divergent ways to solve the problem…

But such assumptions have implications that we tend not to think deeply about, e.g.; First, when individuals work together in a group, any unexpected perspectives will come from workers who are different– the black person in a group of whites, or the marketing person in a group of engineers… will bring forward a different point of view that the group can benefit from… Second, even more important, is that workers who appear to be similar to each other, such as; two middle-aged white men, will share same views… And is it realistic to assume that all superficially alike people think alike?

In the article Workplace Diversity by William Powell writes: We have been saturated with the idea of diversity in organizations… We have heard about the benefits and how organizations are less productive when they have less diversity. Lack of diversity is equated with racism, bigotry, discrimination, host of other negative connotations… Diversity has devolved into a metric that organizations use to show they are ‘progressive‘…

It has become a part of marketing and recruiting campaigns and its diminished the original need for diversity into nothing more than a metric that’s supposed to make organizations feel warm, gooey and accepting as if they have reached a state of enlightenment… What good is it if the diverse nature of workers have no voice or outlet for expression in an organization? What good is diversity if it’s in direct opposition to what is actually needed in an organization…

In the article Diversity Is Bad for Business by Jack Manhire writes: The fact is that in a global marketplace diversity alone is often bad for business. Yes, the range of economic and demographic trends demands greater diversity in organizations but diversity by itself typically ends up being a quota system… or according to Laura Liswood; it’s Noah’s Ark approach by selecting– two of these, two of those, two of the others…

All too often, those hired to fill the quotas soon learn that they are not hired for their unique skills and they are not included in the ‘inner circle’ of the organization… This leads to a feeling of exclusion with the only hope for getting into the ‘inner circle’ being to assimilate and leave one’s true self at the door, and to act more like everyone else. Then guess what happens when workers feel excluded or forced to assimilate? They leave the organization! Hence, diversity often leads to more turnover and drives down an organization’s  performance… It’s for these reasons that both; diversity and inclusion are necessary for a high performing organization…

Studies show that diverse organizations with low inclusive culture have lower profitability, higher attrition rates, less employee discretionary effort, and less likely to capture new markets… On the flip side, diverse organizations with high inclusive culture have greater market share, higher discretionary effort, higher intentions for management and workers to stay with the organization, and enjoy an operating profit that is almost three times higher than non-inclusive organizations… Hence diversity alone is bad for business, but inclusion and a sense of belonging are the keys that unlocks the rich performance benefits of a diverse workforce…

Diversity Teetering on Insanity– Diversity Needs a Refresh: Diversity Alone Is Bad for Business– Its ‘Inclusion’ That Matters…

Every organization is full of people who look different, talk different, think different, act different from one another, at least at some level… Hence, the primary challenge for business is not just to become more diverse but more important to become more inclusive… consider people’s commonalities– consider people’s sameness… consider people’s sharing common purpose, experience, goals…

This may seem counter-intuitive but it suggests that for business (society as a whole) to be successful must have a substantial foundation of commonality, which encourages inclusiveness in order for diversity to flourish… The misinterpretations of what diversity and inclusiveness mean and what they truly represents have limited their ability to have a real impact and influence in business…

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An organization needs– controllers, thinkers, dreamers, doers, organizers, team builders… to reach the strategic goals and outcomes that define the character of a successful organization… an organization is not sustainable with people– fighting, mistrusting… each other because of their differences… Diversity is ubiquitous and it includes; black and white, female and male, gay and straight, all religions, young and old… the diversity of every individual, slow learner and fast learner, introvert and extrovert, controlling type and people type, scholar and sports-person, liberal and conservative…

According to R. Roosevelt Thomas; long-term success of any business calls for a diverse body of talent that can bring fresh ideas, perspectives and views, understand dynamics and mindset and values of a globalized world… but most important, diversity without inclusion will fail…

In the article Why Diversity Can Be Bad For Business– Its Inclusion Stupid by Sebastian Bailey writes: Research suggests that higher market growth is driven by more innovation and better quality decision made within diverse and inclusive teams… and that diversity ‘alone'(without inclusion) is damaging for individuals, organizations…

Research suggests that ‘differences alone’ lowers– revenue, performance, employee morale and well-being, along with slower decision-making, increased conflict, absenteeism, missed opportunities and more (expensive) discrimination cases… But when coupled with an inclusive culture, diversity delivers higher performance, less absenteeism, more customer satisfaction and greater innovation…

Unfortunately many well-meaning diversity initiatives fail because organizations behave defensively… they only put in place minimum policies so as to avoid lawsuits… and very little effort to develop a mindset of inclusion…

Few organizations even distinguish between diversity and inclusion, let alone measure or target them individually. While diversity can be addressed as a compliance issue and tracked fairly easily, the range of individual behaviors which make-up inclusion mean that it’s trickier to pin-down… Inclusiveness happens when very different individuals feel free to embrace their uniqueness and are accepted as full members of the team. Enforced participation efforts don’t work–

A recent study showed that up to 61% of individuals in a workplace feel like they are covering-up something of themselves in order to– fit in at work. Faking it to fit in; not a recipe for engagement or performance…

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In the article Downside of Diversity by Michael Jonas writes: It’s increasingly popular to speak of racial and ethnic diversity as a business strength. From multicultural festivals to pronouncements from political leaders, the message is the same; our differences make us stronger…

According to Robert Putnam; diversity makes most people uncomfortable… but discomfort isn’t always a bad thing. Unease with differences helps explain why teams of workers from different cultures may be ideally suited to solve vexing problems… Culture clashes can produce a dynamic give-and-take, generating a solution that may have eluded a group of people with more similar backgrounds and approaches…

However, there is a growing body of research indicating that more diverse populations seem to extend themselves less on behalf of a group’s collective needs and goals, i.e.; higher diversity can mean lower social capital…

Putnam writes; those in more diverse communities tend to– distrust their neighbors, regardless of the color of their skin, to withdraw even from close friends, to expect the worst from their community and leaders, to volunteer less, to give less to charity and work on community projects less often, to register to vote less, to agitate for social reform more but have less faith that they can actually make a difference… And if all of this is true– then how can one explain the great melting-pot cities that drive the world’s creative and financial economies?

According to Scott Page; notion that civic lassitude drag down diverse communities is at odds with the vigor often associated with urban centers, where ethnic diversity is greatest… And if diversity is a liability for connectedness, there is a parallel line of research that suggests it can also be a big asset for driving productivity, innovation… The different ways of thinking among people from different cultures can be a boon– diverse teams tend to be more productive…

In the article Diversity Policies Rarely Make Companies Fairer by Tessa L. Dover, Brenda Major, Cheryl R. Kaiser write: Companies spend millions of dollars annually on diversity programs and policies. Mission statements and recruitment materials touting companies’ commitment to diversity are ubiquitous… Many managers are tasked with the complex goal of ‘managing diversity’– which can mean anything from ensuring equal employment opportunity compliance, to instituting cultural sensitivity training programs, to focusing on the recruitment and retention of minorities, women…

However, most programs are not very effective and produce very few if any tangible benefits to companies or targeted individuals… A study of over 700 companies found that implementing these programs have little positive effect and may even decrease diverse representation…

Most people assume that diversity policies make companies fairer… though the data suggest otherwise… Research suggests that diversity initiatives seem to do little to convince minorities that companies will treat them more fairly… Participants from ethnic minorities viewed a pro-diversity company as no more inclusive, no better to work for, and no less likely to discriminate against minorities than a company without a pro-diversity stance…

The implications of this study are troubling for the ways we currently attempt to manage diversity and foster inclusion in organizations. Groups, e.g., white men… that typically occupy positions of power may feel alienated and vulnerable when their company claims to value diversity. This may be one explanation for the lackluster success of most diversity management attempts; when people feel threatened they may resist efforts to make the workplace more inclusive…

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In the article Is There Such A Thing As Too Much Diversity? by Koyel Bandyopadhyay writes: The chief argument against diversity appears to be that some business skills are concentrated in certain places, certain groups of people, certain cultures… Hence, narrowness can be a source of strength and cohesion, not a sign of weakness.

Diversity is a technique, not an end in itself. It needs to be balanced against other considerations, such as; clustering of skills… and companies need not necessarily be ‘representative’ of the population as a whole… business needs much more diversity of thought on the subject of ‘diversity’.

Human beings are social beings and the way they bond with other humans is chiefly through– real or imagined– similarity, which is known as homophily (where people tend to bond with people that they think are similar to themselves)…

According to Robert D. Putnam; there are two human social tendencies; one is bonding connections– to be forged among like-minded individuals… and the other is bridging connections— to be formed between heterogeneous groups… In today’s globalization, individual identities are  becoming increasingly dynamic and the cultural discourse is often finding overlap, which is good news for mitigating some of the distrust and prejudice against diverse groups, and in forming those bridging connections…

The long-term success of any business calls for a diverse body of talent that can bring fresh– ideas, perspectives and views to their work… According to Harris Sussman; diversity is about– relatedness, connectedness, interactions… where the lines cross. Diversity is many things, e.g.; bridge between organizational life and the reality of people’s lives, building corporate capability, framework for interrelationships between people, learning exchange, strategic lens on the world…

According to David Goodhart; in the rhetoric of the modern liberal state, the glue of ethnicity (i.e., people who look and talk alike) has been replaced with the glue of values (i.e., people who think and behave alike)… According to Jane Jimenez; every age faces the human struggle to ‘get along’… but today, at least, we are supposed to be a kinder and gentler age… Years ago, even as mere children, we knew there were many different kinds of people… different languages, cultures, skin colors…and we knew we needed to work to get along… Maybe back then, we knew it, but today we have codified it… 

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We are no longer simply different; we are ‘diverse’… and for business to succeed it require a level of ‘inclusion’– whereby individuals must alter some of their innate beliefs and behaviors– which is why it’s more difficult to realize, but yet so very powerful when it happens… and organizations must address ‘inclusion’ as a cultural issue.

Hence, starting point is a few key shifts in attitude; from diversity alone (delivered at corporate level) to diversity and inclusion (delivered by individuals); from demographics to diversity of thinking; and from diversity as an issue of compliance to an essential facet of business success…

Power of Inclusion– Don Quixote of Organizations: Inclusion is Not Panacea, But Not to Embrace It– is Delusional…

Often in business you hear the word ‘inclusion’ used in context of creating opportunities for all who desire to participate. When many people think of inclusion they focus on the organizational culture, behaviors, and practices that allow everyone to feel included in the quest to create success…

Moreover, when an organization embraces the development of an inclusive culture where everyone is valued, then the practical consequence is that the business is better positioned for long-term sustainability… and an organization is much more likely to retain and attract top talent… But, What does inclusion look like? Inclusion is sharing ideas from all perspectives, it’s people working together despite differences to create success for common cause, its creation of culture where differences of thought and opinions are embraced with enthusiasm and celebrated…

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Then, What does inclusion ‘not’ look like? Inclusion is not about creating the ‘delusion’ that everyone will always get along, it’s not about pretending to agree for the sake of avoiding conflict, it’s not about ignoring the cultural, gender… differences that may exist… From mankind’s earliest days, human beings have a fundamental need to belong, so it’s important to create an inclusive environment where everyone feels valued and respected, with equal access to same levels of opportunity. That’s because individuals who feel part of a group tend to perform better and collaborate more.

According to Miller and Katz; inclusion is a sense of belonging, feeling respected, valued for who you are; feeling a level of supportive energy and commitment from others, so you can be the best you can be... Research has shown that inclusion results in– reduced turnover, greater altruism, more team engagement, plus you are more likely to share information, and participate in decision-making… According to Christine M. Riordan; when teams are all-inclusive they tend to work more collaboratively, and that makes good things happen– more ideas, improved morale, better outcomes…

In the book, Inclusion: The New Competitive Business Advantage by Shirley Engelmeier writes: Inclusion is a call to action within the workforce and that means actively involving every employee’s– ideas, knowledge, perspective, experiences, approach, and style to maximize business performance– It matters; because there are certain realities of global business that make inclusion an important competitive advantage…

Organizations needs to be prepared to engage the global community on their terms, which means expanding your organization’s knowledge base with employees who understand the different cultures, behaviors, preferences… also, domestic demographics are rapidly changing with far greater diversity in the population...

Hence, organizations must embrace and create authentic inclusive initiatives that provide for fair and uninhibited opportunities for all employees, such that; they all can contribute, achieve… to best of their abilities… Remember, an inclusive organizations cultivates ‘differences’, and these differences are x-factors that produce higher productivity, greater employee retention, more innovation.

According to Martin Ruef, in study of 766 graduates from Stanford Business School analyzed the social and business relations, found– that the entrepreneurs with the most diverse friendships scored three times higher on the metric of innovation, proving that pooling, inclusion, together with diverse ideas drives; more, better, best innovation…

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In the article Creating Inclusive Corporate Culture by Lindsay Walker writes: Diversity allows companies to better understand the needs of its customers, helping design and create products to suit a variety of different preferences… To properly manage diversity, companies need to focus on creating an ‘inclusive’ cultures. An inclusive culture takes time but once achieved it helps companies manage future conflict in response to changes in the workplace…

Inclusion is where organizations can quiet cultural discord… A successfully inclusive company institutes an inclusion initiative to remove the shortfalls of conscious or subconscious bias to make a company a better meritocracy.  Inclusion allows companies to attract a wider range of qualified employees, thus through their influence attract a wide range of customers… increasingly employees’ are making employment decisions based on an organization’s culture, reputation, and level of inclusiveness in decision-making.

The article ‘The Ethics of Inclusion: Three Common Delusions’ sheds light on the real challenge of inclusion, and states– to find ‘common cause’ for work is very important, and this cannot be done effectively if employees isolate themselves from each another based on differences such as; race, culture, nationality, gender, ability, personality… Inclusion does not mean that an employee has to like everyone they work with, but they must still respect the opinions of fellow employees…

Developing an ‘inclusive’ culture requires effort from every member within an organization… Most important, ‘inclusion’ must be high priority for an organization (not just tag-line), it must have  with a specific statement defining its policy, goal as it relates to ‘inclusion’… these should be displayed prominently in documents, websites…

In the article Why Employee Inclusion May Matter More Than Employee Performance by Peter Crosby writes: Most leaders like to think of their organization as an ‘inclusive’ family of friendly, welcoming folks who smile all the time, hold hands, whistle happily, and work together like a well-oiled machine… However, this inclusion delusion is far from the truth in most organizations. In the real world, many organizations typically splinter into smaller groups who purposely excluding others who are not exactly like them, and they inevitably devolve into a wall of exclusion

Walls of exclusion are bad for business because they are the human version of system silos, and often these little fiefdoms are created by ambitious, bias, self-centered people seeking to increase their own control, authority… These ‘walls of exclusion’ prevent the seamless transfer of information, which is necessary for workers to achieve their very best… and worse yet these walls can fester into major issues for an organization…

According to Marie Mitchell; excluded workers sometimes begin behaving unethically, unproductive in a misguided attempt to ingratiate themselves… Exclusion is a cancer, and it has a huge negative effect on an organization…

In the article The Ethics of Inclusion: Three Common Delusions by John O’Brien, Marsha Forest, Jack Pearpoint, Shafik Asante, Judith Snow write: Here are three common delusions about inclusion:

  • Delusion 1: Inclusion means that everybody must love everybody else or ‘We must all be one big happy family’ (OBHF)…The ‘one big happy family’ (OBHF) delusion is the exact opposite of inclusion. The real challenge of ‘inclusion’ is to find common cause for important work that cannot be done effectively if you isolate yourselves from one another along the many differences of race, culture, nationality, gender, class, ability, personality… that truly do divide…
  • Delusion 2: Inclusion means everyone must always be happy and satisfied or ‘inclusion cures all ills’… The delusion that Inclusion equals happiness leads to its opposite: a pseudo-community in which people who are disagreeable or suffering have no place unless the group has the magic to cure them… This delusion creates disappointment that ‘inclusion’ is not the panacea…
  • Delusion 3: Inclusion is the same as friendship or– We are really all the same…  The question at the root of ‘inclusion’ is not– Can’t we be friends? but– Can we all just learn to get along– to live with one another? We can’t get along if we simply avoid others who are different and include only those with who you feel comfortable and similar… The delusion of sameness leads away from the values of inclusion.

Companies must put in place key initiatives to meet the changing workforce: First, it must create a culture of inclusion that is implemented enterprise-wide, which means that every voice is an important voice and must be respected… a workplace is melting pot of cultures, and organizations must acknowledge the uniqueness of its employees… Second, it must celebrate the best ideas from where-ever, who-ever they may originate in the organization… praise the ideas that came from the ‘ranks’ just as much as those that come from the ‘rafters’…

According to Deborah Chambers Chima; it’s leadership’s responsibility to create a culture where different thoughts from different employees openly shared and opportunities are provided for all people to contribute and achieve to the best of their ability… Great leaders understand that organizations must embrace– all people, all places, all ways, and all the things that makes people different…

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According to T. Hudson Jordan; organizations must have both diversity and inclusion to be successful… Many organizations lack a complete understanding of the full potential of a diverse and inclusive workforce as a business imperative. While many organizations appreciate inclusion, very few actually embraced inclusion as an important business priority for the organization… Inclusion is a competitive imperative; it enhances an organization’s ability to achieve superior business results…

We live in a world that emphasizes– realistic expectations, clear success; and according to James March; Don Quixote had neither… But through failure after failure he persisted in his vision and his commitment; he persisted because he knew who he was. Don Quixote is heroic figure for many people nowadays; he was a dreamer who fought against great odds, he remained faithful to his noble goals… Don Quixote had courage to see things as they should be, and who believed that nothing is impossible…