Posturing for Power– Fake It ‘Til You Make It: How To Bullsh*t Your Way Through Difficult Situations…

‘Fake it ’till you make it’… The power of ‘bull’ in action– action being something you ‘do’ as a result of something you ‘think’… It’s simply mind conditioning and it works… Dress the part, talk the part… most importantly, ‘think’ the part and miraculously you ‘become’ the part… ‘fake it ’till you make it’, or ‘think it until you believe it’, or ‘act as if’ are common catch-phrases…

According to Mark; these are bull-shit slogan and they are contrary to common sense… ‘Fake it ’til you make it’ is simply a stall tactic designed to give extra time to ‘get it’… and ‘getting it’ is simply overlooking certain realities… Faking it puts the onus on the person to rationalize the pretense…

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But there is another view, e.g.; ‘fake it til you make it’ isn’t about putting on an act, it’s about having courage and perseverance to practice new, uncomfortable, yet empowering behaviors with the intention of becoming better person– the person you want to be… ‘Faking it’ takes tremendous determination to stretch beyond the comfort zone of your– thoughts, behaviors… According to Mallie Hart; ‘fake it ’til you make it’ may be the most ridiculous buzz phrase around– it’s a fake fallacy. Any level of fakery is a faux pas best avoided when it comes to doing business… Fess-up, don’t fake it; before you mess-up’…

In the article When You Should Fake it ‘Til You Make It (When You Really Shouldn’t) by Avery Augustine writes: The phrase– fake it ’til you make it– is advice that’s tossed around quite often and on the surface it sounds harmless. It puts a confident façade as you learn your way around– eventually as the premise goes, you won’t have to fake it anymore… But after being put in a number of professional situations in which I had no idea what I was doing, I’ve determined a simple rule for determining when it’s beneficial to fake it– and when it’s best to admit weakness…

In almost every professional role you are in– at least until you have several years of experience under your belt– you are going to be tasked with responsibilities that will push you out of your comfort zone… And while you may very well know how to do these things in theory, you may not feel confident doing them in practice…

These are situations in which you have full permission to ‘fake it ’til you make it’… You have all the knowledge you need, so feigning a little courage won’t do you any harm. Putting on a brave face will not only help you get through it, it will give you genuine confidence for the next time you’re in this situation… On the other hand, there will be situations in which you truly don’t know how to do something, when it comes down to basic knowledge of a task or responsibility, feigning expertise isn’t going to help you. In fact, it will likely hurt…

Simply putting on a confident face while doing an unfamiliar task won’t actually give you the ability to successfully complete that task. More likely, someone will eventually catch onto the fact that you don’t know what you’re doing and call you out on it. Then, you’ll have to waste everyone’s time starting from scratch. In these situations, it’s a much better idea to own up to your weakness and track down the information you need before attempting the task. Once you have that knowledge, go ahead and ‘fake it’ all you want…

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In the article Faking It Til You Make It Actually Works by Austin Considine writes: Fake it till you make it; is not just about convincing other people who you are competent. New science shows that faking it affects the faker, as well. It changes in physiological ways that make you calmer and more confident… According to Amy Cuddy and Dana Carney; they designed a study in which subjects were asked to assume high-power pose (like stand-up straight with hands on hips) or low-power poses (like touch the neck while sitting) and hold them for two minutes… Various tests afterward showed that people who held high-power pose were more likely to take risks and showed a 20% increase in testosterone…

Ms. Cuddy, it turns out, is living proof: When she was 19 she was in a terrible car accident where she was thrown from the car. When she awoke she was in a head trauma unit, and she had to withdraw from school. Her IQ, she was informed, had dropped by two standard deviations. After working her butt off to complete college anyway she went to Princeton, where she was afraid she would be discovered to be a fraud. A professor encouraged her to ‘fake it’, and she did. Now she’s a Harvard professor, her advise: Don’t fake it until you make it– Fake it until you become it…

In the article Don’t Fake It ‘Til You Make It by Deb Calvert writes: In selling, the notion that you should ‘fake it ‘til you make it’ damages credibility… Customers know when you are ‘faking it’ and you won’t fool them for long… The worst stereotypes about selling comes from the notion that you should ‘fake it ‘til you sell it’, e.g.; some sales people grasp at any straw to find even the slightest hint of a connection, often using a tool like LinkedIn to latch onto something, anything, anyone… that can provide some-level of common ground with a customer… or, they may claim they’ve been referred by someone… or, they may pretend they are returning a phone call or following-up when, in fact, it was the very first contact made… some sales people go to any length to fake it…

But, when you ‘fake it ‘til you sell it’, you are not going to sell it… Instead be authentic and start by developing a mindset that is intent on truly creating value for each and every customer… Don’t take an artificial or trumped-up approach to selling… When you bring real value to the customer you will make the sales… but not when you faking it…

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There is a difference between ‘faking it’ and misleading or lying: It’s one thing to stretch the true– how you present yourself, how you interact with others… It’s something else entirely to make people believe you are something you are not, by lying… According to Darrell Vesterfelt; when you are going for that new stretched ‘gig’, do a bit of introspection… your driving force should be more than just raw ambition or fatter paycheck… Those motivations can lead you to make poor decisions… But when you are passionate about what you do, or what you have the potential to do in a new gig, or have a vision for wanting to move up, then you are more likely to ‘fake it’ for the right reasons… 

According to Mike Michalowicz; fake is simply another word for something (or someone) that is inauthentic. Fake is the total opposite of– real, authentic… Fake is fake. Fake cannot be changed. Fake can only be replaced with real. You must have the real thing, to be the real thing… According to Nadia Goodman; everyone has a moment when they feel they must ‘fake’ something, or possibly sell an idea that was thrown together at the last minute. In these moments you may have thoughts that make you feel just a little dishonest, which is understandable.

But knowing how to appear confident in difficult situations is a valuable asset… It’s a skill that allows you to act like you know what you are doing even when you don’t… it’s a skill that you should embrace, refine… without premeditated or intentional desire to harm or deceive– it will help you feel credible even when you are out of comfort zone…

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According to Mark-Anthony Smith; ‘fake it ’til you make it’ is disingenuous The term imply faking– confidence, experience, skill… to appear as something or someone that it’s not but, the majority of business (or for that matter life) doesn’t see it that way… acting confident is rewarded, even if you are ‘faking it’… According to Steve Tobak; some people exaggerate their knowledge, experience, accomplishments… everyone does it. 

Hence, if you are a knowledgeable and experienced professional just trying to boost your confidence to help achieve the next rung on your career ladder, it can be argued that you are not faking anything… However, when you are really ‘faking it’– pumping up your ego with delusions of grandeur when in reality you have little or no talent, capability, or experience to back-up claims, or the way you represent yourself– then that will not end well…