Perils of Sitting-Standing While Working– Standing vs. Sitting: Human Body is Designed to Stand– Sitting All Day is Deadly…

Sitting vs. Standing: Work cubicles are where brains go to die and every day they willingly sitting down in the death chair. Here’s the kicker: You’ll be repeating it ad infinitum for the foreseeable future. Melodramatic? Hardly. Is it a problem you can solve? Absolutely; if you find the courage to rise-up…

According to Kate Taylor; it’s hardly breaking news that sitting at work all day is bad for you. Sitting for hours may mean you’ll increase your chances of dying younger than your standing counterparts– no matter how much you work out. On the other hand, if you cut the time you spend parked behind your desk daily, you may extend your life up to three years…

The research suggests that after an hour or more of sitting, the production of enzymes that burn fat in the body declines by as much as 90%. Extended sitting, they add, slows the body’s metabolism of glucose and lowers the levels of good (HDL) cholesterol in the blood. Those are risk factors toward developing heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

According to Dr. Toni Yancey; the science is still evolving, but we believe that sitting is harmful in itself… However, even with these grim facts, not many people are really willing to stand up and do something about it… Sloth is rampant, for example; a typical car-driving, television-watching cubicle slave would have to walk an extra 19km a day to match the physical-activity levels of the few remaining people who  still live as hunter-gatherers…

Health care professionals have been nagging people for decades to do more exercise. However, what is surprising is that prolonged periods of inactivity are bad regardless of how much time you also spend on officially approved high-impact stuff like jogging or pounding treadmills in the gym: The latest research suggests that constant low-level activity is also needed. This can be so low-level that you might not think of it as activity at all. Even just standing up counts, for it invokes muscles that sitting does not…

On the other hand and even more disturbing are some health warnings about working while standing… According to some health care literature; the optimal work arrangement is ‘frequently’ changing the working position– from sitting to standing and back…

standing thCALJ6E2U

In the article Stand-Up While You Read This! by Olivia Judson writes: Your chair is your enemy: It doesn’t matter if you go running every morning, or you’re a regular at the gym. If you spend most of the rest of the day sitting– in your car, your office chair, on your sofa at home– you are putting yourself at increased risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, variety of cancers and early death. In other words, irrespective of whether you exercise vigorously, sitting for long periods is bad for you.

That, at least, is the conclusion of several recent studies. Indeed, if you consider only healthy people who exercise regularly, those who sit the most during the rest of the day have larger waists and worse profiles of blood pressure and blood sugar than those who sit less. Among people who sit in front of the television for more than three hours each day, those who exercise are as fat as those who don’t: Sitting a lot appears to offset some of the benefits of jogging a lot. So what’s wrong with sitting? Sitting is one of the most passive things you can do. You burn more energy by chewing gum or fidgeting than you do sitting still in a chair.

Compared to sitting, standing in one place is hard work. To stand, you have to tense your leg muscles, and engage the muscles of your back and shoulders; while standing, you often shift from leg to leg. All of this burns energy… Some people have advanced radical solutions to the sitting syndrome: Replace your sit-down desk with a stand-up desk, and equip this with a slow treadmill so that you walk while you work… But, whatever you choose, know this: The data are clear; beware of your chair.

In the article Dangers of Sitting at Work and Standing by Bryan Walsh writes: Standing to work has long known to be problematic, it’s more tiring, it dramatically increases the risks of carotid atherosclerosis (nine-fold) because of the additional load on the circulatory system, and it also increases the risks of varicose veins, so standing all day is unhealthy…

According to Alan Hedge; the problem with standing is that when you raise desk height for keyboard/mouse use you need to also raise screen height above the desk or you get neck flexion and other musculoskeletal disorder like carpal tunnel syndrome. In field studies of so-called sit-stand workstations, Hedge has found little evidence of widespread benefits for users… He also notes that the use of stand-up desks tends to rapidly decline after about a month…

Hedge acknowledges that sitting for hours at a time, uninterrupted, is not good: So he advocates a middle way– use a sitting desk with proper ergonomic posture, but make sure that about every 20 minutes you stand up and move around for a brief period of time: Research shows that you don’t need to do vigorous exercise (e.g., jumping jacks) to get the benefits; just walking around is sufficient.

So build in a pattern of creating greater movement variety in the workplace (e.g., walk to a printer, water fountain, stand for a meeting, take the stairs, walk around the floor, park farther away from the building each day)…

In the article Standing Up for Work Can Improve Your Health and Productivity by Denise Reynolds RD writes: Research has shown that people who stand at work tend to be much healthier than those who sit. Extended periods of sitting, thus being sedentary, can lead to an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

One study found that a woman’s risk of developing metabolic syndrome increased 26% for every extra hour of sitting. Prolonged sitting in an upright position can place strain on the back resulting in chronic pain. Blood clots are another risk of being inactive… Periods of standing through-out the day can improve circulation, muscle tone and vitality. The increased weight on the skeleton is good for maintaining bone strength. You may even lose weight. Standing for just two hours during an average workday can burn an extra 280 calories. In one year, that could potentially provide a weight loss of around 20 pounds…

Getting out of your chair can also offer psychological and productivity benefits. Standing while you work improves concentration by increasing blood flow to the brain. Many who stand say– their thinking is clearer, improved ability to focus on problems, and some report feelings of improved self-esteem and social development…

standing sit-down-die-young

In the article He Who Sits the Most Dies the Soonest by Neil Wagner writes: A study of more than 200,000 Australians adds to the growing body of evidence that people who sit the most die the soonest. The study’s simple message is that spending more time standing and less time sitting prolongs life. The current study took a more direct approach, looking at the relationship of total daily sitting time to the likelihood of dying within the next three years, seeking to put a number on just how harmful prolonged sitting is.

Its most striking finding was that people who sat more than 11 hours a day had a 40% higher risk of dying in next three years than people who sat less than four hours a day. This was after adjustment for factors such as; age, weight, physical activity and general health status, all of which affect the death risk. It also found a clear dose-response effect: The more people sat the higher their risk of death… In other words, people still need to exercise, but it’s important also, to spend less time sitting…

Stand up, office workers of the world! You have nothing to lose but your chairs. And even if they are made of– supple executive leather or high-tech Aeron mesh, those chairs are lethal. According to Drake Bennett; excessive sitting is slowly killing you; this may sound like hyperbole: But it’s not.

A study found that men who sit for more than six hours of their leisure time each day had a 20% higher death rate than those who sat for three hours or less. The epidemiologist who conducted the study, Alpha Patel, concluded that excessive sitting literally shortens a person’s life by several years.

Another study showed that men who sat for 23 or more hours a week had a 64% greater chance of dying from heart disease than those who sat for 11 hours per week or less. According to Brett & Kate McKay; sitting is the ultimate passive activity; your heart rate, calorie burn, insulin effectiveness, and levels of good cholesterol all drop. Your body also stops producing lipoprotein lipase and other molecules that are only released when you flex your muscles, such as when you are standing and walking.

Add these factors up, and it’s no wonder that those who sit for long periods of time each day have larger waistlines, worse blood sugar, blood pressure profiles, higher risk of heart disease, than who sit less. And, if you think you’re off the hook because you do a bout of vigorous exercise each day, you’re not. Studies have shown that exercise does not counteract the negative effects of sitting. It’s like thinking you can snack Twinkies all day, and then offset that by running for an hour…

According to Patrick J. Skerrett; the human body is designed to stand, not sit…  According to Mark Sisson; we aren’t designed to sit in chairs all day… sitting weakens our muscles, especially in the legs and the hips… According to Dr. Buckley; people are sitting at work, sitting in the car and then sitting in front of the television… your metabolic rate crashes to an absolute minimum– it’s not natural: Humans are designed to stand up and keep moving. Although, if sitting is deadly then standing all day can also be hard on the body: It puts strain on the heart and increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis and varicose veins…

According to Alan Hedge; standing all day is really not good… So what is a person to do? According to most ergonomists; the watchword these days is postural rotation: Sit a little, stand a little, then repeat…