We the People in Crisis: Govern Of the People, By the People, For the People Is Meaningless Rhetoric…

On the brink of the presidential election, it might be useful to examine the state of the U.S. Democracy and the role of ‘We the People’… The most striking lesson from contemporary U.S. election campaigns is how vast and growing the distance is between the rhetoric of politicians and pundits, and the actual deepening, immense, largely ignored problems that afflict ‘We the People’...

The billions of dollars spent on dubious and manipulative advertisements that are only rivaled for the idiocy of ‘news media’ campaign coverage… which serves primarily to insult people’s intelligence, rather than expose the truth. Even more problematic is mainstream politics, which is increasingly irrelevant to the real issues that the nation faces… or perhaps more accurately, it’s mainstream politics that is the major contributing factor to the real issues the nation faces…

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Whatever happened to Abraham Lincoln’s; government of the people, by the people, for the people… According to Gilens, Page; the preferences of the average person appears to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy… In other words, statistics say that your opinion– ‘We the People’– literally does not matter… The data is clear that U.S. is sliding steadily into oligarchy, mirrored in both the substantive effect on policy and in distribution of wealth…

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by small number of people… Members of the oligarchy usually includes; well-connected and politically powerful– people, institutions, trade unions, lobbying groups, business groups, special interest groups… Researchers have found that government policy follows the directives set-forth by these groups much more often, than the average citizen… According to E.J. Dionne; the U.S. is failing and it needs a better ‘We the People’…

In the article This Isn’t What Democracy Looks Like by Robert W. McChesney writes: Capitalism and democracy have always had a difficult relationship. The former generates severe inequality and latter is predicated upon political equality… Capitalist democracy therefore becomes more democratic to the extent that it’s less capitalist… According to John Nichols and Robert W. McChesney; U.S. is better understood by the rule of money rather than the rule of the people… it’s a U.S. form of plutocracy; it’s ‘Dollarocracy’, which  means that those with the most dollars get the most votes and have the most influence… Dollarocracy is so dominant and so pervasive, that it’s accepted as simply the landscape people inhabit…

The notion of– ‘you get what you pay for’ applies in spades to spoils of government, and the tens of billions of dollars spent by corporations, institutions, special interest groups… on lobbying, public relations, campaign donations… and now dollarocracy is a large part of the overall economy. According to Larry Bartels, Martin Gilens, Jacob Hacker, Paul Pierson; the interests and opinions of great bulk of ‘We the People’ have virtually no effect over the decisions made by government.

According to Joseph Stiglitz; the more divided a society is in terms of wealth and influence, the more reluctant the wealthy are to spend money on the people’s common needs… The wealthy don’t need to rely on government for parks or education or medical care or personal security– they can buy all these things for themselves. And in process they become more distant from ‘We the People’ losing whatever empathy they may once have had…

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In the article U.S. is a Constitutional Republic ‘not’ a Democracy by Daneen G. Peterson, Ph.D. writes: How often have you heard people refer to U.S. as a ‘Democracy’? And, when was last time that you heard U.S. referred to as a ‘Republic’? There is a very good reason that the ‘Pledge of Allegiance’ refers to the country as a ‘Republic’ and there is a very good reason that the ‘Declaration of Independence‘ and the ‘Constitution’ do not even mentioned the word ‘Democracy’… The Founders were very knowledgeable about the issue of democracy and feared a democracy as much as a monarchy…

They understood that the only entity that can take away the people’s freedom is their own government, either by being too weak to protect them from external threats or by being too powerful and taking away people’s freedoms. They knew the meaning of the word ‘democracy’, and the history of democracies; and they did everything in their power to prevent having a democracy… In a republic, the sovereignty resides with the people. In a republic, one may act on his/her own or through his/her representatives when he/she chooses to solve a problem. The people have no obligation to the government; instead the government is a servant of the people and obliged to its owner– ‘We the People’– but many politicians have lost sight of that fact…

George Washington, Alexander Hamilton et al… knew it and feared it, and they lived to see those fears through the blood, violence, and terror of the French Revolution… They were familiar with the excesses of democracy and though they sought the virtues of democracy, they created a political system specifically designed to shackle its vices… They held Rome as their model, not Athens… and they created a Republic, which is a synthesis of three forms of government, i.e.;  dictatorship/monarchy, oligarchy/aristocracy, democracy… They combined the virtues of each of these separate political systems, and while trying to mitigate their weaknesses…

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In the article U.S. in Crisis Mode, and We’re All Complicit by Jim Sleeper writes: The political election news is all about Trump, but the crisis that has made his victory isn’t about Trump… It’s about ‘We the People’ and what is happening in the U.S.– no populist  rhetoric of democracy can hide the truth that– what’s ‘happening’ to the people is– what’s ‘being done’ to the people’. If you believe that then the people  are complicit because, after all this is democracy, where sovereign people have free-will to choose. But are ‘We the People’ as sovereign as we think, or are we caught in a spider’s web of; 800-numbered, sticky-fingered pick-pocketing machines, including; most news media that bypass people’s brains and hearts on the way to their lower viscera and wallets…

Why do people put-up with the casino-like financing, predatory lending, omnivorous marketing, deft political blame-shifting… and ‘We the People’ let them grope us, titillate us, intimidate us, addict us, track us, indebt us, and sell us illusory escapes that leave us too ill to bear the sicknesses or their cures… Instead, we point fingers, fists and even guns at people who are really no more guilty than us. Or we blame the inexorable tides of globalization and technological upheaval…

We excuse or worse, even adore the real villains and when we do that, we are complicit… And here we are; conservatives blame liberals for summoning ‘movements’ that turn ‘We the People’ into ‘takers’… Liberals blame conservatives for turning ‘We the People’  into stupefied consumers and mobs. And each side is only half right; they are right only about how the other-side is wrong… Let’s stop listening to such one-sided thinking…

In the article What Is the Role of the People? by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. writes: The stirring opening words of the Constitution proclaim that it’s the work of ‘We the People’… In the Declaration of Independence, the people announce that they are sovereign and free… In the Constitution, they defend this freedom by creating a unique government that derived its just powers from the consent of ‘We the people’. But what is the role of the people? According to John Adams; the first role– the first duty– of the people is to ensure that they remain– virtuous and free… According to Thomas Jefferson; it’s the manners and spirit of the people who preserve a vigorous Republic…

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The Founders placed great hopes in the Constitution, but they knew–‘no piece of paper’ can preserve liberty: That duty rested ultimately with ‘We the People’… The role of the Constitution is to restrain and to check, not to guarantee . The words of Declaration of Independence and the design of the Constitution can inspire, but on their own they cannot preserve the democracy (or even the republic, if you will): Only ‘We the People’ can do that…

According to Ronald Reagan; freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. ‘We the People’ have the obligation to pass the inheritance of freedom on, unimpaired, to the next generation… The true role of ‘We the People’ is to ensure that ‘we’ and ‘government’ stay true to those principles… with fair and balance ‘free press’ and  ‘open ballot box’: ‘We the People’ created this Republic and ‘We the People’ must preserve it…