Is Traditional Marketing Dead? Age of Internet, clicks, views…, tweets…, blogs…

In the early nineties there was a notion that the Internet would alter the face of Marketing. Unless you live in a cave, it has! But it is not just the Internet that has changed the way we market products or services, technology has also had a dramatic impact on how we conduct and market our businesses.

There is a new breed of marketer that is emerging from our schools and universities. They understand the power of the web and know how to use it well. This is the age of clicks, views, downloads, followers, Facebook, Tweeter, blogs…

In an article “Traditional B2B Marketing is Dead” by Holger Schulze writes: We are experiencing nothing short of a major disruption in marketing today. New technologies and marketing automation are just one expression and a driver of this change, but it goes much deeper, affecting the way we organize marketing, engage with customers, find new business opportunities, and deliver value to the stakeholders…

Every dimension (including balance of power, audience focus and presence) has significant implications on the way we plan, organize, and execute B2B marketing going forward. We are seeing a classic adoption pattern with early adopters and laggards, false starts, and a mix of “traditional” best practices that are still applicable combined with new methods.

In the article “Is Traditional Marketing Dead?” by Patric Fransko writes: Social media, in and of itself, is not a marketing program. In fact, one can argue, and many do, that social media is overrated and not even truly needed as part of a marketing program in 2011. While it is true that some companies can still flourish while completely ignoring social media, I think they are missing a large opportunity. It is my belief that the integration of social media alongside traditional marketing represents a superior option to using either of these strategies alone. So, is traditional marketing dead? Absolutely not!

In the article “Traditional Marketing is Dead!” by Mael Hernandez writes: The Internet is changing the way business is conducted, but it has the most effect with marketing. The Internet provides instant feedback about which marketing campaigns are and are not working. The Internet gives companies the ability to present your Unique Selling Proposition without pressure and at your customers’ convenience.

The Internet is the “Great Equalizer” because it allows small-medium businesses to compete with the big boys. The Internet gives every business access to the same technology used by big companies. Web analytics can measure traffic on your web site, and RSS feeds increase communication with current and potential customers as well as the ability to instantly measure marketing campaigns and their effectiveness…

In the article “Traditional Marketing is Far from Dead!” by Matt Paines writes: A recent survey by the Royal Mail, UK postal service provider, found that physical postal mail can be used to improve online marketing strategies… The survey found that more than 50% of respondents said they were more likely to click on a link for a company that had already communicated with them by direct mail…The most significant element of the survey, certainly as far as internet marketing is concerned, is that two thirds of respondents said information received in the post had influenced their decision process when purchasing online…

In the article “Traditional Marketing is Dead; Gen-Y Killed It”  by Aiden Livingston writes:  The days when marketers could confidently sink all their advertising dollars into traditional media such as TV and radio are dead.  The problem is the new generation of consumers, commonly referred to as Gen-Y, doesn’t play by the same rules most had come to take for granted. Gen-Y wants to be talked to, not talked at.

The conversation should be a dialog not a lecture.  Don’t tell me why I should buy your product without first asking what I want in a product. Thanks to the prevailing force of the internet such as Facebook, Tweeter,… Gen-Y is more reachable than any generation before it.  Yet still many companies don’t take advantage of the accessibility of Gen-Y

In the blog “Is the Traditional Marketing Funnel Dead?” by Frank Candio writes: The advent of social media and Sales 2.0 has led many B2B marketers to ask if the traditional marketing funnel is dead. In a Sales 2.0 world, buyers are shopping without the assistance of a sales rep or even the knowledge of the vendor. If the buyer controls much of the sales process…does that make our traditional marketing funnel obsolete?

The traditional marketing funnel is not dead. Most companies use some version of the   A-I-D-A (awareness, interest, decision, action) marketing model. This has not changed in the Sales 2.0 world. What have changed are the marketing tools and techniques we use to engage and guide the prospect through each stage…

In the article “The Future of Traditional Marketing” by BrettRelander writes: Marketing is changing and it’s time to consider the options: 1. Recognize the changing landscape and adapt. 2. Die a slow and miserable death. You need to recognize how marketing your business is changing and how you can leverage that change to improve your business.  That’s right, it doesn’t have to be a monumental feat and you don’t have to be a “web guru” to figure it out.  You simply have to be willing to learn and change. 

Traditional Media is not dead, it’s changing. Many self proclaimed thought leaders, social media moguls, and digital marketing experts have been pushing their agenda that traditional media, specifically print ads, are dead for some time now.  Although this may be the case down the road, it is certainly not the case today.  The aging population (traditional media consumers) is far too big.  Traditional media is not dead, but evolving.

In the article “Traditional Media Marketing is Not Dead; It’s Just Dying” by Brian Hamlett writes: two schools of thought about traditional marketing media. Either 1) traditional marketing is dead, or 2) traditional marketing is not dead…yet. Traditional marketing is not dead, it’s just dying. With the rise of social media came the beginnings of the demise of traditional media. More advertisers are moving their marketing budgets from offline activities to online activities…

It’s time for traditional media to move into the next phase of their existence. They just need to figure out how to combine with social media: Connecting and forming communities, relationships built on mutual trust, openness and honesty consistently communicated… They need to learn how to become a part of our communities of influence rather than trying to be the global dictator of them. So it must learn to adapt or death is just around the corner.

In the article “Dead: New Report Declares the Death of Traditional Marketing” by Brian MacGrady writesPeople are turning to the internet and smart phones to find local business information. The ease of access and amount of information is turning this world into a giant connected intelligence. You cannot ignore the importance of integrating online and offline marketing.

Successful new age marketing must align with three ‘R’s; Relevance, Response and Restraint. “The current ‘push’ model of marketing is becoming ever more obsolete as consumers have become more used to control over the media they choose to consume. Technology has empowered the individual and they are no longer forced to endure irrelevant communications.

In the article “Don’t Abandon Traditional Marketing Methods: Integrate and Interact” by Greg writes: While social media is an important element to business marketing, it’s not a replacement for proven forms of promotion. With its low cost, easy barrier-to-entry and seemingly widespread reach, it’s tempting to think social media can replace other forms of marketing. But it’s important to remember that social media in and of itself isn’t a marketing strategy: It’s but one promotional tool in the smart business marketing toolbox.

Two important things to remember in business marketing today are integration and interaction. Integrate your online and offline campaigns, and integrate cohesive online campaigns across social networks… Interaction (talk with, not at) to engage audiences and make them feel an emotional connection to your company, brand or product. Prospects are much more likely to listen to you and follow what you’re doing if they feel that you care about them and that they’re important to your business…

In the article “Reasons Why Traditional Media is Making a Comeback” by Greg writes: It’s the Content, Stupid: The core mission of media is to inform, entertain and inspire. That has not changed nor is there any indication that it will. While it might be fun to keep in touch with your fraternity brothers on Facebook, that’s not really content. It’s no accident that so much of what we see on social media is actually links to mainstream media.

In new media, we just don’t have that much experience built up.  Problems are not clearly defined, solutions are relatively untested and the context is constantly changing.  Is it any wonder that nearly 90% of media budgets still go to traditional media? Strangely enough, given the excess of bile coming from social media gurus, social media itself seems to be helping traditional media rather than hurting it. Social media and mainstream media are much more symbiotic than they are competitive…

In the blog “Are the Four Ps of Marketing Dead? by Paul Roetzer writes: We are taught the four Ps of traditional marketing – Product, Price, Place and Promotion. While these fundamental elements are still relevant, they may not be as important in business today as the four Ps of inbound marketing – Personas, Participation, Publishing and PageRank. Inbound marketing refers to permission-based marketing strategies (e.g. blogging, social networking, search engine optimization) in which you connect with consumers online when they are actively looking for what you offer.

The result is a more measurable, efficient and effective lead-generation system, powered by social media relationships, Website traffic, inbound links and search engine rankings.

“Once every hundred years, media changes. The last hundred years have been defined by the mass media. In the next hundred years, information won’t be just pushed out to people: It will be shared among the millions of connections people have.” – Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook

Inbound marketing is powered by content – blogs, podcasts, videos, optimized press releases, case studies, white papers, eBooks and articles. And unlike traditional outbound marketing, in which you have to buy space in print media or airtime on broadcast media, the social Web has created an almost endless array of low-cost and free distribution channels to directly reach and influence consumers.

In the article “Traditional Media is not Dead, It’s Fueling Social Media” writes: There’s no question that social media has upended things in the marketing world. However, in times of change it’s easy to be a revolutionary and kiss off everything that was old, so rejoice; “Traditional media is dead.” No so fast; the fact is that traditional media is not dead – it’s fueling social media.

A recent study for instance found that 95% of local news is being created by newspapers, not blogs or other social media, which are simply regurgitating what they find in papers.

“The most productive PR path, in my humble opinion, is still a blended approach to social and traditional media. In fact, traditional media coverage in atoms and ink publications, or digital hybrids like MarketingDaily, provides material to drive social media campaigns…~ Len Stein (blog post)

Tell your story in multiple channels and multiple ways. Sure, tell it to the traditional media, the trade media, and local media. Talk it up on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn. Post it on Delicious, Digg and other social media. Announce it in a video, a podcast… Expand upon it in a whitepaper…

“Link to the resources on your website from your Twitter account. Use Google Adwords to help prospects find you. (Bid wisely on the keywords your prospects are searching for) Write guest blogs. Comment on leading industry sites. Write articles for traditional offline media like newspapers and business publications. Speak at conferences. Start a LinkedIn group. Seed the web. Seed the world.” ~ John Kewley