Immutable Laws of Business– Guide-Posts for Success: Unlike Gravity– Immutable for Some is Mutable for Others…

Immutable laws define the business… they rule our lives… they define us… Immutable laws are a blend of ethics, core values and self-assigned law, all wrapped up into one. They define culture, business, people… almost subconsciously– on what is right and what is wrong… what is acceptable and what is not… what makes you happy and what doesn’t. They are with us for life and they barely ever change… However, immutable for some is mutable for others…

According to Harold S. Geneen; it’s an immutable law in business that words are words, explanations are explanations, promises are promises but only performance is reality… According to Mike Michalowicz; some immutable laws are understood by everyone: gravity, for example; what goes up must come down. But other immutable laws are not so well understood, for example; to survive, an enterprise must make profit. Even ‘not-for-profit’ enterprise must take in more money than it spends…

Immutable laws trigger’s that nagging voice that punishes, when broken. They also give assurance, when following their guidance. They cause you to judge the business, yourself… They keep you on track… it’s the soul of the business… For almost all, immutable laws are stuffed away in our subconscious and to leverage their power you need to make them part of daily–conscious thought… If all facets of the business are consistent with its immutable laws, it will grow fluidly, even at times effortlessly… Immutable laws are important (if not critical) in business, life…

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In the article Immutable Law of 168 by Greg Luken writes: According to Tom Peters; calendars never lie. They are 100% accurate and visible indicators of your priorities…  then, there’s Prado Principal or ‘80/20 Rule’ (where 80% of the results come from the top 20%)… and, there’s Rule of 72 (72 divided by any percentage gives you the approximate number of years it takes for your money to double)… But, one of the most powerful principles is the ‘Immutable Law of 168’ states: No matter how you ‘manage’ your time, there are still only 168 hours in a week. And the quality of your life will be directly related to how you spend your 168 hours…

Time management is not a time issue at all: It’s a priority issue… Time, unlike money, cannot be invested. Time is a commodity that can only be spent. And everyone has the same 168 hours in his or her week… It would be great if we could ‘bank’ the time spent waiting on something– like unused cellular minutes, to use more time doing things we actually want to do. But there is no bank where you can store time to use in the future. We can only spend it…

When it comes to the Immutable Law of 168, consider: Are their activities I need to rethink? Are there boundaries I need to establish? Are there things I need to get onto my calendar, or things I need to eliminate from my 168-hour week, to improve the quality of my life and the lives of the people I love? Do I spend my time focusing on things beyond my control or on the things I can control? Am I doing the things that only I can do? Am I living out who I was created to be? How will you spend your next 168?

In the article 10 Immutable Laws by Pratapaditya  Chakravrty writes: The following are some pearls picked up on the journey of life…

Item1: Nothing of what happens inside matters, unless it matters to someone outside… Explanation: The focus shouldn’t be on the processes inside the company, but rather it should be on the clients, consumers, customers…

Item2: Avoid– ‘but’, ‘however’, ‘no’ in your communication. Explanation: These words introduce anarchy in communication. If avoided, a manager can create positive relationships and mend broken ones. Usages like ‘Your idea is nice, but try it look at it my way’ is equivalent of saying ‘Don’t use your brains, donkey! You are paid to do what I say’…

Item3: Don’t doubt… Explanation: It helps avoid negative perceptions and builds a clear perspective. To see if a man is responsible, you need to trust him…

Item4: Don’t bad-mouth… Explanation: What would you do if a snake bites you? Run after the snake to take revenge? Or try to remove the venom off you?

Item5: Shun Mediocrity… Explanation: Mediocrity is so rampant that many times we decorate it as greatness. Just run away from mediocrity. The car parking space need not always be rectangular… Item6: Stand by your people… Explanation: Do this and they weep, when you cry…

Item7: Build your team’s equity… Explanation: Equity here is personal equity…

Item8: Live what you preach… Explanation: Don’t be a parish priest giving sermons. Don’t be an obese trainer giving lectures of personal fitness. Your listeners won’t buy it.

Item9: Don’t run away from what you do… Explanation: Just don’t run away from problems. If you won’t face them now, you would never learn anything, and you would remain undeveloped.

Item10: It doesn’t matter what you think of yourself, what matters is what others think of you… Explanation: Being ego-centric is the biggest vice of a manager. Be friendly to one and all. This creates a great work atmosphere and the workplace will be more productive…

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In the article Immutable Laws of Innovation by philmckinney writes: Over the years of being in the innovation space, I’ve discovered a set of laws by trial and error. Needless to say, I have the scars from the school of hard knocks to validate that these are the set of laws that are critical for innovation success. If you violate any one of them, consequences can be disastrous.

These laws apply to all sizes of organizations ranging from established multi-nationals, to early stage start-ups to governments. So how do I use these rules? No single organization has it all figured out. By taking an honest audit of your innovation programs against the laws, you can identify the areas that work and those that don’t:

1) Law of Leadership: Executive level support (Board, CEO and his/her direct reports) is critical for an organization that wants to have innovation at is core. Leadership means talking-the-talk AND walking-the-walk. It means committing (and protecting) resources (time, money, people, equipment) for innovation…

2) Law of Culture: Establishing and nurturing an innovation culture sets the foundation for the organization. For leaders it means rewarding the right behavior (teamwork, collaboration, honesty, trust) and identifying and eliminating bad behavior (not-invented-here, passive/aggressive, turf battles)…

3) Law of Resources: Innovation requires a committed level of resources (people, money, time, equipment) over an extended period of time. The level of resourcing is the validation for the importance and commitment the organization devotes to innovation.

4) Law of Patience: Innovation takes time. More time than is expected. The organization must take the long view on innovation and avoid the temptation and resist the pressure for short-term adjustments.

5) Law of Process: To succeed at innovation, organizations need an innovation process that fits and works within their organization and culture. The process should cover the full innovation chain from idea capture through the last steps of execution.

6) Law of BHAG: What is a BHAG? A BHAG is ‘Big Hairy Audacious Goal’. It’s what leadership lays out as the innovation agenda. The BHAG sets a clear and compelling target, serves as unifying focal point of effort, and acts as a clear catalyst for team spirit. It has a clear finish line, so the organization will know when it has achieved the goal.

7) Law of Execution: The ability to execute on both the innovation agenda and quarterly objectives of the operating business is a key skill that the organization needs to have. Focusing on only one area of execution leaves the other to flounder. Segmenting the execution roles into separate silos works against the Law of Culture.

In the same way that the law of gravity is immutable, there are certain immutable laws of business too with which you must comply, if you are to have a successful business… If you go to any bookstore and head down to business section you will see a multitude of books which discuss the laws of business. Some are good and others not so good. Some contain good ideas for improving your business, others discuss immutable laws… Here are a few interpretations of immutable laws:

    • According to petrosianii; 3 Immutable Employee Laws: 1. Employees don’t follow directions. 2. Employees don’t submit to authority. 3. Employees don’t like being evaluated. Now, these are generalities. Before you react in visceral indignation– with ‘that’s not true of all employees’– let me disarm that argument up front and say, ‘Yes, I know and I agree.’ But they seem to be true of a lot of employees that I’ve hired…
    • According to Al Ries & Laura Ries; 22 Immutable Laws of Branding— examples; Law of Publicity, Law of Word, Law of Credentials, Law of Fellowship, Law of Name, Law of Borders,  Law of Mortality, Law of Singularity…
    • According to Regine Azurin and Yvette Pantilla; 18 Immutable Laws of Corporate Reputation: Everything an individual or company does or produces contributes to its reputation. Reputation is an intangible asset, but a very important one. In some ways it is even better than having money in the bank, but not as easily quantified… A good reputation is its own advertising and quality seal. A good reputation can bring in more customers in good times and act as a protective buffer in bad times… reputation management has three parts: establishing good reputation, keeping that good reputation, repairing damaged reputation…
    • According to Consillium Global Business Advisors; Four Immutable Laws of International Marketing & Localization: International expansion is critical and the four immutable laws of international marketing localization are– Law #1: Protect Your Company & Your Brand. Law #2: Adapt but Don’t Copy. Law #3: First–Don’t Lose Them, Second–Entice Them. Law #4: Don’t Do It Yourself…
    • According to James Gilbert; First Law of Social Media Marketing: The deeper the level of engagement, the deeper the customer’s trust and bond with your company. Nothing happens without engagement, making it the most important social media rule… along with reaching out, telling a story, creating drama…
    • According to Robert Lutz; Seven Laws of Business: The customer isn’t always right. The primary purpose of business isn’t to make money. When everybody else is doing it, don’t. Too much quality can ruin. Financial controls are bad. Disruptive people are an asset. Teamwork isn’t always good…
    • According to Philip Sugai, Marco Koeder, Ludovico Ciferri; Six Immutable Laws of Mobile Business: Law #1–Value Over Culture. Law #2–The Law of Ecosystem. Law #3–Mobility Empowers. Law #4–The Value of Time Zones. Law #5–Mobile-Specific Business Models Are Essential. Law #6–The Future Is Simplexity…
    • According to Al Ries and Jack Trout; Immutable Laws of Marketing: examples– Law of Leadership. Law of Category. Law of Mind. Law of Perception. Law of Focus. Law of Exclusivity. Law of Perspective. Law of Attributes. Law of Singularity. Law of Unpredictability. Law of Success. Law of Failure. Law of Hype. Law of Resources…
    • According to Russell Thomas; 10 Immutable Laws of Effective Networking: 1). Get a business card, ‘use’ it! 2). Find common ground. 3). Follow-up, same day. 4). Make additional ‘connections’ when appropriate. 5). Watch for ‘cues’, get in, get out. 6). Leverage the Law of Reciprocity. 7).Walk a mile in their shoes. 8). Get the name right. 9). Be respectful, full of attention, intention. 10). Be proud, passionate; be memorable…

You may or may not agree with any of these and other immutable laws… but there are some fundamental factors that are very important for business success (or indeed any success), which you cannot afford to ignore, for example; confront the brutal reality of your present business situation and set realistic goals and execute…