Human Primeval Instinct, Impulse– Shape Modern Business: Hidden Drivers of Great Performance…

Primeval nomadic tribes represent a lost ‘golden age’ of humanity… For hundreds of thousands of years, uncomplicated people with basic survival skillful traveled around in their tribal communities. They followed the seasonal cycles and existed– naturally, simply, harmoniously, in tune and unchanging within their environment…

Research shows that they didn’t have to work hard to fulfill their needs, they had plenty of leisure time, there was little or no disease, no poverty… Far from the Victorian depiction of depraved half-starved savages, the lives of the ancient human ancestors were structured, well- organized, flourished for thousands of years…

According to research; at least one-fifth of the Neanderthal genome may lurk within modern humans… findings revealed that Neanderthals interbred with ancestors of modern humans when modern humans began spreading out of Africa perhaps about 40,000 to 80,000 years ago, although some research suggests the migration began earlier: About 1.5 to 2.1% of the DNA of any human outside of Africa is Neanderthal in origin.)

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According to David Miles; humans, as opposed to primitive ancestors, have developed a modern world which is psychologically, socially, materially excessively complicated and unsustainable… Apparently humans have lost the essential values, as originally laid out by nature and promulgated through ancient ancestors, and are struggling to accommodate the demands of modern world psychology… According to Catherine Perigo; tribal communities of primitive ancestors were not motivated by the ‘self’; they were guided by the spirit of the tribe, which exists outside of themselves, not internal to themselves…

In the article ‘Primeval Managers’ Offer Modern Lesson in Success by Quinn Spitzer and Ron Evans write: One of the most important changes in the business world has gone unnoticed: the changing of the guard in business leadership with executives, such as; Packard at Hewlett-Packard, Morita at Sony, Walton at Wal-Mart, Walsh at G.E., just to name a few… Virtually an entire generation of top executives have left business after achieving legendary status…

These ‘old guards’ are the last of a breed of executives who developed their management skills almost entirely in the workplace. They built businesses when management ‘science’ was still in its infancy. The executives of this period did not learn about business from– business schools, or management gurus, or management books… they learned and honed their business skills in the hard-knocks of a primitive ‘business jungle’: These were ‘primeval managers’… These executives were not just people of action, but people of thought– critical thought– and raw primeval instincts…

In the article Primal Experience in Business by Ben Gran writes: Every business can learn something from this idea of the customer’s ‘primeval’ experience… Most people don’t buy things because of rational, specific needs; most often they make their buying decisions based on emotional needs, i.e.; subtle signals and connections that make you feel better. It’s not your ‘rational brain’ that makes the decision as often as the ‘lizard brain’ that wants to feel safe, comforted, protected…

Hence, you must ask: What is your business really selling, deep down? What is the ‘primeval’ experience that makes customers want to buy from you? Not every business’s ‘primeval’ experience is the same. You must know exactly what ‘you’ are offering customers on a ‘primeval’ level– talk to customers about why they buy… Forging these deep emotional connections with customers is the most effective form of business marketing… If you know why people buy and you ‘forge deep’ into the fundamental reasons, then you can design a customer experience that will tap directly into that ‘primeval’ experience…

In the article Super-Abundance, Art of Consumption Reduction by Annabel Martin writes: How many of you know the difference between; What you need? and; What you want? Where is the dividing line? and; Is that line the same for everyone? and; Is your business investing in the right things? Modern consumer psychology, left unchecked, unrestrained, is running amuck…

In contrast our primeval ancestors would be horrified by the collection and hoarding of the vast amount of ‘stuff’ by modern-day relatives… Material wealth was not only impractical for the primitive ancestors, but it also brought with it a psychology unfitness for tribal life; to hoard or accumulate superfluous stuff would be considered unhealthy… Primitively; it’s thought that a preoccupation with a mundane stuff brings bad luck, sickness, lack of food…

There is much you can learn from the primeval ancestors in practical terms, and it starts by being absolutely clear about; What your needs really are; and; What they are not; The absolutes of primeval life were; responsible, living with nature, reciprocal exchange at the heart of every transaction… ‘Responsibility’ and ‘reciprocal exchange’ are ancient principles based on the idea that you should never take more than you need and when you do, then you are likely to disrupt a fine-tuned, natural balance, not only in the wider world around you but also within your own personal life…

Living responsibly, not only helps to save the earth’s precious natural resources, but it also helps you to have power over limited finances and unhealthy material stuff… These ancient principles are not designed to make people suffer or go without; they are about making life simpler, enjoying what you have, and being absolutely firm in the face of the psychology of ‘abundance’, which has been designed over decades to make you want more ‘stuff ‘ then you absolutely need…

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In the article Leadership Secrets From The Ancients by Matthew Knight writes: There are certain elements of leadership that survive the centuries, that are classical. According to John Prevas; the parallels between great leaders of the ancient world and today is stunning… And while these features aren’t necessarily a guarantee of success in the modern world, they can provide a framework around which success can be built, for example:

  • Alexander the Great (356-323 BC): Alexander III of Macedon is the standard for leadership by which all others are measured, but– does he merit his place as a leadership icon? It’s questionable… On the one hand, Alexander had a capacity for intense focus and was willing to sacrifice friends, family and personal fortunes to reach the top. But ambition fueled by a massive ego eventually proved to be his undoing… Ancient quote: “I see no limits to what man of ability can accomplish“. Modern lesson: Youth is no barrier to success: Be bold and learn to focus on your task, but don’t let your ambition or ego cloud your judgment. Listen to the advice of those more experienced than yourself…
  • Xenophon (circa 435-circa 354 BC): Xenophon was student of the Athenian philosopher Socrates and ruled by consensus. An aristocrat by birth, Xenophon was a Greek military leader, but unlike Alexander the Great, Xenophon didn’t command by force of his personality, but sought to forge consensus. What makes Xenophon so unique as a leader is that he was not a soldier, he was a philosopher. He was elected by the soldiers to be the leader based on his ability to articulate a course of action for them… Ancient quote: “In life a leader must resign himself to expect anything and never count on anyone but himself”. Modern lesson: Tailor your message to your audience and be sensitive to the moods and opinions of the people you manage…
  • Augustus (63 BC-AD 14): Augustus laid the foundations for the prolonged success of the Roman Empire. Julius Caesar famously built the Roman Empire by conquest, but it was Augustus, his nephew and first Roman Emperor, who administered it and took it to its greatest heights… Augustus believed that the conquering achievements of Alexander the Great were actually easy when compared to the task of administering and building an empire.. Ancient quote: “That which has been done well enough has been done quickly enough”. Modern lesson: Augustus said: “Make haste slowly”: In other words, “move cautiously and thoughtfully in everything you do”…
  • Cleopatra (69 BC-30 BC): Ancient Egypt’s last pharaoh is often feted for her seductive beauty. But Cleopatra was also a woman of high intelligence, as evidenced by her grasp of several languages. She was a tenacious and resourceful leader who adopted a ‘hands-on’ approach to power; consolidating her position through civil war with her brother and sister (Ptolemy XIII and Arsinoe IV). She was a realist and wasn’t afraid to gamble on bringing in a more powerful ally when that was what the situation called for, as shown by her personal and political courtship of Julius Caesar and Rome. Ancient quote: Cleopatra’s attitude to power and life could be best summed up with the phrase: “Let it be done”. Modern lesson: Leaders who back up their god-given attributes with hard work and imagination can create a formidable business package…

In the primeval and ancient worlds, altruism is not driven by unconditional love but by ritualistic practice… According to Annabel Martin; primitive tribal life was not born simply out of the will of individuals wanting to do the right thing, just for the sake of doing the right thing… Translated in modern business terms, it means; when you put someone in an environment that is supportive, fair, harmonious… they will be inspired to contribute to that support, fairness, harmony… partly because they are encouraged to share what is given to them through gratitude, but also because if they don’t they risk losing it all…

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On the other hand,  when you put an individual in an environment that is unequal, discriminatory, then their inspiration quickly turns to resentment… According to Michael M. Crow; humans through  remarkable manipulation of limited knowledge, brute force, and overwhelming arrogance, have shaped a world that in all likelihood is not sustainable, e.g.; standard of living, all stuff, quality of life, inequalities… According to Dr. Eli Goldratt; Just stop doing the stupid stuff! The rest is genius!