ClimateGate Big Business; Global Warming, Climate Change– $1.5 Trillion Per Year: Manage Risk, Follow the Money Trail…

Global warming is the greatest humanitarian crisis of our time, responsible for rising seas, raging storms, searing heat, ferocious fires, severe drought, and punishing floods. It threatens– health, communities, economy, national security… so say many global warming experts… and, if unchecked, it’s capable of altering the world’s– climate, geography…

However other scientists and observers, a minority compared to those who believe the warming trend is something ominous, say it’s simply the latest shift in the cyclical patterns of the planet’s life… Most of the scientific community believes that some warming is occurring across the globe, and through some layers of the atmosphere. But why it’s occurring and what does it mean for the future of the planet– is scientifically and politically contentious…

According to Warren Meyer; it’s important to understand the core issue of the global warming (climate change) debate– it’s hypothesis of ‘catastrophic man-made global warming’ theory… We are not just talking about warming but warming that is somehow man-made. And we are not talking about just a little bit of warming, but enough that the effects are catastrophic, and justify immediate and likely expensive government action…

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According to a study by Marshall Burke at Stanford University; our research relies on historical data from countries around the world on how temperature increase has affected productivity. This means the study does not account for economic impact of sea level rise, storms or any of other expected effects of climate change beyond simple warming, e.g.; sea level rise, increased storm intensity… if you think those things are going to worsen the effects of climate change, then our estimates would be an underestimate of the potential impacts, which is sort of terrifying…

This study is far from the first to suggest that climate change will slow economic growth. Big business has been especially keen on highlighting the potential damage. A Citigroup report found that minimizing temperature rises to 2.7ºF (1.5ºC) could minimize global GDP loss by $50 trillion, compared to a rise of 8.1ºF (4.5ºC) in the coming decades; clearly that is catastrophic…

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The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference was held in Paris, France, from 30 November to 13 December 2015. The conference negotiated a global agreement on the reduction of climate change (global warming), the text of which represented a consensus of the representatives of the 196 parties attending it… The agreement becomes legally binding only when at least 55 countries sign-up, which together represent at least 55% of global greenhouse emissions (although no enforcement mechanism).

Parties then need to sign the agreement in New York between 22 April 2016 — 21 April 2017… as well as, adopt it within their own country’s legal systems (i.e., through ratification, acceptance, approval)… The conference expectations at the outset was for an agreement that would set a goal of limiting global warming to less than 2 degrees Celsius (°C), compared to pre-industrial levels… The actual agreement calls for the pursue of efforts by countries to limit warming increase to 1.5°C… and for zero ‘anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions’ to be reached during second half of 21st century (the 1.5°C goal requires zero emissions some time between 2030 and 2050)…

According to Stephen Eule; the Paris agreement delivered more of the same– lots of promises and lots of issues still left unresolved… critics say that making energy more expensive and less abundant to satisfy a few alarmists should worry the business community, workers, consumers… Whereas, supporters hope the deal will unleash an avalanche of financing and investment from entrepreneurs, companies, international lenders into renewable energy sources, alternative technologies…

At the core of the agreement is a collection of voluntary plans submitted by every country to tackle climate change, each reflecting its own economic, political situation…

Most of the focus is on shifting to renewable energy sources, such as; solar, wind, nuclear power… and away from carbon-heavy fuels such as; coal, oil… However, much of the success of this deal lies in implementation by governments many years from now, which haven’t even been elected… Also, the plans are not legally enforceable– condition the U.S. among other countries insisted upon– although the deal does legally bind countries to a periodic review of their processes with hopes that countries will repeatedly raise their greenhouse-gas-cutting efforts… In addition, developed countries have to help provide at least $100 billion annually after 2020 to help developing countries cut their emissions…

According to Seth Borenstein and Sylvie Corbet; this agreement is highly flawed– there are about 100 places in the agreement that lack specific decisions with multiple options left in brackets, blank spaces… and one major issue unresolved is money: The draft doesn’t settle the question of whether advanced developing countries should join more wealthy nations in helping the poorest and most vulnerable nations deal with climate change…

It doesn’t resolve the question of the long-term goal of the agreement– whether it’s to remove carbon emissions from the economy altogether or just reduce them… Nor does it settle whether governments are aiming to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5°C (2.7° F) above pre-industrial times or closer to 2°C (3.6° F)…

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In addition, developing nations are demanding more money as they struggle with an increase in extreme weather events such as; hurricanes, heavy rains, floods… The U.S. agreed to double its contribution to help vulnerable nations adapt to the effects of climate change, by increasing grant money to $860 million from $430 million by 2020… The money is part of an existing ‘promise’ by wealthy countries to jointly mobilize $100 billion per year by 2020. It will help fund domestic weather services and tracking systems to better assist poorer nations in forecasting, coping with extreme weather…

According to James Hansen, who is considered the father of climate change; it’s a fraud, a fake… It’s just bullshit for them to say… there is 2°C warming target and they will try to do a little better every five years… it’s just worthless words. There is no action, just promises. As long as fossil fuels appear to be the cheapest fuels out there, they will be continued to be burned…

In the article Is Climate Change Now Its Own Industry? by Don Jergler writes: Interest in climate change is becoming an increasingly powerful economic driver, so much so that some see it as an industry in itself whose growth is driven in large part by policymaking… A survey of those already in the industry shows that 53.5% of those polled felt that federal or state climate change policy development would be ‘strong positive’ driver of growth in their business. More than one-third felt that policymaking would have a ‘very strong positive’ impact on their business growth…

Much of the growth is expected to come from demand for forward-looking strategic assessments of climate risks, with more companies making risk assessments to look at the impacts of climate change over next 10 – 15 years. Growth in the climate change consulting market continues to shift from greenhouse gas management and mitigation, to climate change risk assessment, adaptation…

Adaptation is increasingly folding into a broader concept of resilience, which lines-up with broader goal of sustainability– it’s a focus on how companies, communities, nations… can grow while enhancing environmental, social values…

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In the article Is It Global Warming Or Just Weather? by The Economist writes: For years, the central debate of climate science has focused on how much global mean surface temperatures would rise by 2100… The increase in the ‘mean’ is the simplest way to measure the long-term impact of climate change. But it has drawbacks; it makes global warming seem like something that will happen in 100 years time.

Most people do not think about global temperatures, but they do think about local ones. And climate change effects ecosystems not just through increases in the ‘mean’, but also through changes in the ‘extremes’, e.g.; more intense droughts… Extremes also have a profound impact on people, e.g.; a heat wave in 2003 caused about 70,000 premature deaths in Europe…

Focusing on links between climate change and the local weather thus makes sense in terms of both science and public understanding… In principle, attributing the weather to climate change might seem straightforward: The two are so closely related that the climate can be defined as the average daily weather over a long period (or, as Edward Lorenz, meteorologist, once put it; climate is what you expect; weather is what you get)…

In practice, though, there are so many influences upon the weather– famously expressed by Lorenz’s idea of a butterfly’s wingbeat in one part of the world causing a hurricane in another– that isolating any individual factor is hard, i.e.; it’s not possible to say categorically that climate change has caused any individual storm, flood, heat-wave…

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But scientific attribution does not require certainty; it deals in probabilities… Hence, stopping, mitigating global warming is a risk management issue… If ‘Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’ (IPCC) is right, and we don’t do anything, we risk hugh temperature increases that will lead to loss of the great ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica resulting in a high increase in sea levels, which would take about 100 years if we do nothing– consider all of the major cities located on coasts lines around the global, i.e., Asia, Europe, Africa, North American… and huge costs in life, property, resources. If they are right…

However if ‘IPCC’ is wrong, and we still did everything we could to reduce new emissions of greenhouse gases, then the down-side is– we would reduce annual increase of global GDP by about 0.12%, which is a manageable cost… Hence it’s all about risk management, science has outlined facts about global warming; now it’s up to the global community to manage the risks involved with global warming (climate change)…