Curiosity is Engine of Business Success: It’s Driving Force Behind– Innovation, Invention, Discoveries…

Business ideas are often born out of applied ‘curiosity’; it’s testing the old and seeking the new, which leads organizations to success. Curiosity is the engine for solving complex problems and identifying new opportunities… curiosity is a fundamental component to– creativity, innovation… and without it business lacks the energy to succeed…

According to Kristof De Wulf; humans are curious by nature but organizations are not– most business practices fail because they don’t encourage or embrace curiosity. Organizations can only be curious because they are composed of people who are curious…

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According to Enrique Rubio; the most important creative process occurs when people question what they see; and in doing so they are letting ideas and doubts simmer in the ocean of ideas and experiences that they have in their conscious and subconscious. It’s a slow cooking process in which the ideas and doubts are the ingredients, ignited by the fire of curiosity…

Curiosity is a fascinating act of insubordination against tyranny of the status quo, and by challenging the ways things are, and it unlocks limitless potential to innovate. The future will be less about money, power or size… and more about agility, networking and sharing… In order to survive and thrive organizations must grow into a permanent state of curiosity, and making it a core strategic competence…

In the article Curious People Are Destined for C-Suite by Warren Berger writes: Welcome to the era of the curious leader, where success may be less about having all the answers and more about wondering and questioning… In a PwC survey of more than a thousand CEOs; many of them cited ‘curiosity’ and ‘open-mindedness’ as traits that are critical for leaders in challenging times. Curiosity inspired leaders need to continually seek out fresh ideas and approaches that keep pace with rapidly change and highly competitive market environments. According to Brian Grazer; lead-by-curiosity is the engine that generate more ideas from all areas of an organization, and the catalyst for worker engagement…

The desire to keep exploring ‘new paths’ becomes even more important in today’s fast-changing, innovation-driven marketplace… While curiosity is known as igniter of startup ventures, it also plays an important role at more established organizations where leaders must contend with disruptive change in their marketplace… According to Ron Shaich; in today’s highly competitive business environment, a leader’s primary occupation must be to discover the future… It’s ‘a continual search requiring leader to be curious and keep exploring new ideas, including; ideas from other– markets, industries, even from outside the business world…

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In the article Business Value of Curiosity by Geoffrey James writes: Being successful at business requires many things, e.g.; courage, creativity, people skills… however, there is one character trait whose importance is sometimes neglected: Curiosity… It’s like a Swiss Army Knife with all attachments– it gets the job done in nearly every situation, and it’s easy to access once you’ve got it in your tool kit. In short, curiosity is at the core of every successful organization and without it success becomes very illusive… Curiosity is the foundation for:

  • Building customer relationship: People are drawn to those who show interest in them. Having an abiding curiosity in others give you the opportunity to learn new things about them, thereby making a deeper connections…
  • Increasing your business acumen: Being curious about your own industry and the industries of your customers drives you to learn more. As you satisfy your curiosity, you’re augmenting ability to add value to customers’ business…
  • Solving customer problems: It’s a truism that customers are looking for solutions to their problems. It’s only possible to create meaningful solution when motivated by true curiosity– about what’s actually going on and why problems occur…
  • Negotiating win-win contracts: Your ability to understand the positions of the other party are directly dependent upon your ability to feel true curiosity about them. If you’re not curious, you’ll end up arguing about issues that aren’t important…
  • Sales failures: When a customer buys from somebody else (or doesn’t buy from anyone at all), if you’re not curious about what happened, you won’t bother to find out why, and therefore can’t learn from failures…
  • Creating great products: Would-be innovators who aren’t curious about what makes people tick and why technology works (or doesn’t) can’t possibly create workable products or services that people want buy…
  • Motivating employees: Some bosses think of employees as cogs in a corporate machine. However, if you want to get the best out of people, you must be curious about their dreams and desires…

In the article Curiosity is Most Important Tool in Business by Garrett Moon writes: One thing separating those that are successful and those that are merely surviving is a spirit of learning and curiosity. Those that never stop trying, learning are the ones that continually leap ahead. Real curiosity comes from discerning eye; one that is able to see what others are doing right, and adapt it for themselves… It’s not copying, but a curious eye that is able to see the real lesson and value and apply it to their own situation… Hence, rather than observing ideas to copy them, curiosity observes to understand them…

And once understood they can be used to improvise new solutions for your business… but it also means asking  probing questions, e.g.; Why use that business strategy? What are the elements of that business model? How is marketing organized? Observe what you can and learn from it… Creativity is a state of mind, and it’s the ability to think in directions that rub against status-quo, and it’s extremely important in most organizations… Brilliant ideas are simply– new approaches to old problems… and all it takes is being curious, imaginative, creative, persistent…

According to Dr. Thomas Chamorro-Premuzic; curiosity is required before one can change and improve their organization; it’s prerequisite for growth… much like the commonly known psychological capabilities of– Intellectual Quotient (IQ) and Emotional Quotient (EQ). The Curiosity Quotient (CQ) is one’s affinity to be ‘inquisitive’ and open to new ideas, experiences, and similar to IQ and EQ… CQ improves one’s ability to understand, navigate complex issues:

  • Intellectual Quotient (IQ): IQ is an assessment of a person’s ability to think and reason… it’s a measure of a person’s cognitive capacity relative to their peers…
  • Emotional Quotient (EQ): EQ is the capacity of individuals to recognize their own, and other people’s emotions, to discriminate between different feelings and label them appropriately, and to use emotional information to guide thinking, behavior…
  • Curiosity Quotient (CQ): CQ is an assessment of person’s level of inquisitiveness, openness to new experiences… they tend to generate many original ideas and are counter-conformist, which leads to higher levels of intellectual investment and knowledge acquisition over time…

According to Ian Leslie; 21st Century economies reward those who have an unquenchable desire to discover, learn and accumulate a wide range of knowledge. It’s not just about who or what you know, but how much you want to know… Technology is rapidly taking over tasks historically performed by humans, and it’s no longer enough to be merely competent or smart– computers are both. But no computer can yet be said to be curious…

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According to Kevin Kelly; machines are for answers and humans are for questions… And, industries are growing more complex and unpredictable and employers are increasingly looking for curious learners– people with an aptitude for cognitively demanding work and a thirst for knowledge… The web is just as likely to neuter curiosity as supercharge it. It presents more opportunities to learn than ever before… Those who acquire the habits of intellectual curiosity early on will use computers to learn throughout their lives; those who don’t, may find they are replaced by one…

The age-old saying– curiosity killed the cat– was used often to prevent people from being curious and asking ‘unnecessary’ questions. The origin of the saying was an article in Washington Post of March 4, 1916, in which the story of a cat, Blackie… Blackie used to go to the chimney of fireplace to hang out. But one day out of curiosity, Blackie climbed up the chimney and, unfortunately, as the story goes, Blackie fell and broke his back, died…

Yes Blackie was curious, yet it wasn’t the curiosity that killed him, but rather the lack of preparation for the mysteries that curiosity revealed…