Challenge for Business– Minimalism Vs. Maximalism: The Great Struggle– Less is More Vs. More is More…

One of greatest joys in life is the feeling of carrying everything you need to survive in your backpack; that is minimalism at its finest… It’s being a step (or more ) removed from the norm of society… In the business world minimalism is a reaction to overkill and pretentiousness of conventional management; it’s moderation and (less) intrusion… The beauty, elegance are the austerity… According to one of the great minimalist minds, Henry David Thoreau; [management] is best which [manages] least… Minimalism is making decisions– more consciously, more deliberately…

Clear away the noise so you can concentrate on creative thinking… However, minimalism can be taken ‘too far’; and ‘too far’ means something different to everyone… it’s about limits and boundaries. According to Leo Babauta; minimalism is a way of eschewing the non-essential in order to focus on what’s truly important; it’s that which gives meaning and purpose, that which gives value and delight… Clear away distractions so as to create something incredible… 

In the article The Power of Minimalist Management by Robert Callan writes: When is ‘good enough’, good enough? How do you know when you’ve reached the point of diminishing returns? And perhaps more importantly, how do you know when you are doing too much? Minimalist management focuses on reducing the number of ‘non-value-add’ managerial activities to zero. For example, if a manager inherits a department where lengthy, frequent, confusing meetings are the norm, then focus on holding fewer but more effective meetings…

Minimalist requires management and employees to engage in activities that really matter. It about thinking long and hard about strategy. It thinking long and hard about talent and management practices. It requires a large amount of reflection, which translates to fewer but truly more powerful activities… Minimalist in business is hard; it requires courage, trust, self-confidence…

In the article Minimalist Road To Success by Annie Mueller writes: A common refrain in minimalist literature is the burden of ‘more’– more stuff, more people, more organization… But sometimes what’s needed is not ‘more’ but ‘less’: Pare down and focus on what matters… The application of this concept to business should be pretty clear to over-worked, overwhelmed managers and employees… You cannot do everything yourself, no matter how great your skills. So you have two options: either leave it undone, or get somebody else to do it…

Much of daily work that is mindlessly done can be undone, most of the time, without any real damage. But it’s when you stay in a rut with head-down, simply mindlessly doing things that becomes the real issue. Take time to eliminate the pointless, the superfluous, the questionable… Then decide what you can hire-out or delegate… and focus your work on activities for most impact on the organization…

In the article Minimalist Economy by Joshua Becker writes: A modern economy is based on ‘consumption’, and that means consumers must spend more and more to grow the economy… But then the dilemma; when consumers spend more (maximalist) to grow the economy, they often go into debt… and when consumers spend less (minimalist), they typically stay out of debt, but then the economy slows…

This economy is built on the premise that people (consumers) must go into debt to sustain it… How long can that last? Can minimalism and a maximalism economy co-exist? Some experts say that an economy based on free-market principles, over time, would adjust and reinvent itself and find new way to grow the economy… Hence, best of all options– growing economy and efficiency of minimalism…

In the article Minimalist Management– Less is More by Ross Smith writes: The hardest part of minimalism is knowing when– enough is enough; whether creating business plan, or designing business website, or initiate customer engagements… The most difficult management task is to know when to just– step back, trust, empower, delegate… According to David Risley; idea here is to simplify the process, trim the fat, make the business lean and flexible... business doesn’t need to be complicated in order to grow; keep things simple, nimble and the business will thrive… According to Thoreau; life is frittered away by detail; simplify, simplify…

Minimalism is philosophy of– doing more with less… and that means radically reducing the amount of stuff that organizations– manage, own, sell… However many experts have a different view and they say; minimalism is a feel-good vibe and as you go deeper, it slowly becomes more dangerous, destructive, particularly for business… And ultimately, they say– minimalism is the squandering of opportunity…

According to Peter Shallard; minimalism makes people complacent, and it actually encourages people to reduce their ambition… Instead of winning at the rat race of business, minimalism would have you drop out completely.  Minimalism encourages short-term thinking, which is destructive over time… It’s toxic because it encourages you to only focus on having what you need– which means rejecting longer-term opportunities that are critical to sustain any organization…

But in reality minimalism is mindset; think of it as pursuit of freedom… According to Neil Patel; growing a business is one of the best paths to minimalism; when you are do more with less, you create freedom that gives– purpose, independence… freedom is ability to organize, apply resources, pursue activities, provide fulfillment… But minimalism isn’t only about ‘less’; it’s also about ‘freedom’ in management…

Although management may seem like an enemy of minimalism with its schedules, calendars, requirements… these are not stuffs of freedom… But there are ways of managing with minimalist mindset… According to Annie Mueller; take time to identify the– superfluous, questionable, pointless… figure out what things in the organization that you– should not be doing, or don’t want to do, or cannot do effectively, or you simply want to get rid of… then decide what can be eliminated or delegated…

Focus on the work that only you can do, that you can do best, and that you can do for the most impact on your organization... Your mind is your greatest asset, and by freeing yourself of unproductive activities you are taking one of the most valuable steps toward minimalism... Minimalism is a journey, not a destination…