Elusive Calendar Reform– Time to Overhaul 2000 Year Old Calendar Used Daily: Illogical, Clumsy, Not for 21st Century…

A calendar is an artificial construct whose fundamental purpose is to be synchronizing and coordinating operating system for human society by keeping accurate track of natural cycles in time, and most commonly to keep track of passing of days and years… More than four centuries ago Pope Gregory XIII designed the calendar we use today as a fix to the Julian Calendar, which had miscalculated the number of days it takes for the Earth to revolve around the sun…

But for 2000 years, which includes its predecessor the Julian Calendar, perceptions fostered by the unconscious acceptance of the Gregorian Calendar are taken as the unshakable bedrock of nature and reality…  According to Jose Arguelles; of all the unexamined assumptions and criteria upon which people base and gauge their daily lives by far the greatest and most profoundly unquestioned is the instrument and institution known as the Gregorian Calendar…

According to Broughton Richmond; if the Gregorian Calendar was offered as a new device for measuring time in today’s world, it would be rejected as utterly impractical, lacking harmony and order, unbalanced and irregular, too clumsy a calendar… However, all current beliefs– economic, political, scientific… are actually products of the underlying perceptions promoted by this calendar, which have no reality apart from the beliefs about time that the calendar engenders…

In the  article Geopolitics of the Gregorian Calendar by Stratfor writes: The systems used by mankind to track, organize, manipulate ‘time’ have often been arbitrary, uneven and disruptive, especially when designed poorly or foisted upon an unwilling society. The history of calendrical reform has been shaped by the egos of emperors, disputes among churches, the insights of astronomers and mathematicians, and immutable geopolitical realities…

Attempts at improvements have sparked political and commercial turmoil, and seemingly rational changes have consistently failed to take root… As we enter the 432nd year guided by Gregorian Calendar, reform advocates argue the calendar’s peculiarities and inaccuracies continue to do widespread damage each year. They say this system unnecessarily subject business to numerous calendar-generated financial complications, confusion and reporting inconsistencies…

Most reform proposals have failed to supplant the Gregorian system not because they failed to improve upon the status quo altogether, but because they either do not preserve the Sabbath, they disrupt the seven-day week (only a five-day week would fit neatly into a 365-day calendar without necessitating leap weeks or years) or they stray from the seasonal cycle…

In the book The Law of Time in Human Affairs by Jose Arguelles writes: A calendar, any calendar, is commonly understood as a system for dividing time over extended periods. The ‘day’ is the base unit of a calendar, and the solar year is the base extended period… The length of the solar year is currently reckoned at 365.242199 days.

The Gregorian Calendar divides this duration into twelve uneven months– four months of 30 days, seven of 31 days, and one of 28 days. On the Gregorian calendar the accrued quarter day is handled by inserting February 29th every four years. This is not necessarily most logical, nor only way of handling the accrued quarter day…

 Recall the folk rhyme– 30 days hath September, April, June, and November; all the rest have 31; except for February which has 28… which underscores the illogical nature of the Gregorian Calendar. By contrast, far easier and more logical way to divide the solar year would  be by thirteen 28-day months with one extra free day. The 13-month, 28-day alternative has been in use on this planet for more than 6000 years.

In prehistoric India and China, and throughout South America it was standard time-keeping system. The Essenes, Egyptians, Polynesians, Maya, Inca, Lakota, Cherokee used 13-month, 28-day calendar. The Celtic knowledge of the Druids is based on the Tree Calendar, also a 13-month, 28-day calendar. Today many cultures are still using their traditional 13-month calendar system…

Hence the point is this: there is no logical or scientific relationship between the exact length of the year and the use of the Gregorian Calendar to measure and divide that length… this calendar is an irregular standard of measurement; its units of measure don’t correspond. This calendar represents an institutionalization of disorder and entropy… Nonetheless, Gregorian Calendar is in use worldwide as official standard and prevails throughout most of the planet…

In the article Simplified Calendar and No Time Zones by Shireen Gonzaga writes: Imagine living in a world where Christmas always falls on a Monday, or there are no more February 29 every four years, or it’s the same time everywhere in the world… And a new date must be found for Halloween, since October 31 will no longer exist… Also, say goodbye to Friday 13th because in a new calendar, the 13th of the month only falls on Saturday, Monday or Wednesday.

Time-keeping can get quite confusing. The world is divided into time zones because traditionally we kept time by sun’s position in the sky. Today, time zones are set in reference to UTC (Coordinated Universal Time), and expressed as plus or minus 1 to 12 hours from UTC. Some countries also have Daylight Saving Time from Spring to Fall so there’s an extra hour of daylight in the evenings... Also while time zones are generally track with Earth’s longitude, they are set politically, not geographically…

Calendar reform is ‘not’ a new crazy idea: It’s important to remember that during the first half of the 20th century, a vigorous and well-organized calendar reform movement flourished. George Eastman of Eastman Kodak organized a campaign on behalf of a particular 13-month, 28-day calendar– The International Fixed Calendar…

This calendar is a perpetual calendar (same every year) with 13 equal months of exactly 4 weeks (28 days) each, comprising 364 days, and with the final 365th day held not in any week or month, often known as a ‘Null Day’ or ‘Zero Day’, so that the first day of the year is always the first day of the week, a Sunday... In U.S. alone, hundreds of industries adopted a 13-month, 28-day perpetual calendar…  

Still another proposal was the Hanke–Henry Permanent Calendar (HHPC), which is one of many examples of leap ‘week’ calendars. These are calendars that maintain synchronization with the solar year by intercalating entire weeks rather than single days. It’s a modification of Common-Civil-Calendar-and-Time (CCC&T)… The HHPC adheres to the most basic tenet of a fixed (read: permanent) calendar– each year, each date falls on the same day of the week; in this case, every year begins on Sunday, January 1; the year is then divided into four three-month quarters.

Each month begins on the same day (and date) each year. The first two months of each quarter are made up of 30 days; the third is made up of 31 days… So each quarter contains 91 days, resulting in a 364 day year that is composed of 52 seven-day weeks. This is vital feature of HHPC, because by preserving the seven-day Sabbath cycle, the HHPC avoids a major complaints from religious leaders that have doomed all other attempts at calendar reform…

The multiplicity of calendars can be explained by variety of scientific, cultural, economic, and religious factors. But it underscores the fact that no calendar has been able to fully address all issues associated with measuring and organizing the passing of time… The ‘calendar’ is the organizing principle of the way world works. It programs societal culture with daily, weekly, monthly and annual customs and habits…

Therefore, to change the calendar is to participate in one of most subtle and profound forms of revolution happening on the planet today… Nonetheless, a change to something as long-established as the calendar is not unthinkable, primarily because it has happened several times before… In other words, calendrical change is possible; it just tends to happen in– fits and starts, lurching through history as each era refines, tinkers and adds its contributions to make a better system…