Business Storytelling–Ultimate Weapon–Passport to Success–Change Thinking: Power of Business Narrative-Storytelling…

Storytelling in business changes the way we think, act, feel… Stories form foundations of an entire workplace culture, and they have power to break down barriers and turn bad situations around…

Stories capture imaginations, illustrate ideas, arouse passions, and inspire in a way that cold, hard facts often can’t. Stories can be powerful business tools, so if you want to motivate others effectively, you need to learn how to tell a good story…

According to Paul Smith; storytelling is useful in far more situations than most leaders realize. The five most commonly used are probably these: Inspiring the organization, setting a vision, teaching important lessons, defining culture and values, and explaining who you are and what you believe… Although storytelling isn’t always the right tool to help ‘manage’ people; it’s an exceptional tool to help ‘lead’ people… People tell business stories to communicate and connect with employees, customers, colleagues, partners, suppliers, and the media…

When you tell a story well, it can create an intense, personal connection between the audience and the message. Effective stories can change opinions, they can inspire to achieve goals that we didn’t think were possible… According to Chris King; don’t call it ‘storytelling’ — many people have the wrong perception about it… it can be a hard sell… I once had a boss who when I told him there was a university that offered a degree in storytelling, he laughed…

Storytelling not only plays a fundamental role in public speaking but it’s also one of the most powerful tools of ‘influence’ that a business leader (or any leader) has at his or her disposal… The art of being able to tell stories effectively in a range of business contexts can be very important; one well placed story can touch and influence many in profound ways…

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What is Storytelling? At its core, storytelling is the art of using language, vocalization, and/or physical movement and gesture to reveal the elements and images of a story to a specific, live audience… A central, unique aspect of storytelling is its reliance on the audience to develop specific visual imagery and detail to complete and co-create the story…

Most dictionaries define a story as a narrative account of a real or imagined event or events. Within the storytelling community, a story is more generally agreed to be a specific structure of narrative with a specific style and set of characters and which includes a sense of completeness. Through the sharing of experience we use stories to pass on accumulated wisdom, beliefs, values…

Through stories we explain how things are, why they are, roles, purpose. Stories are building blocks of knowledge, and the foundation of memory and learning. Stories connect us with our humanness and link past, present, and future by teaching us to anticipate possible consequences of our actions… It ‘s the live, person-to-person oral and physical presentation of a story to an audience…

According to Erica Swallow; the art of business storytelling boils down to two exercises: 1) Figuring out the message; and 2) Constantly testing and iterating upon it, so that it fits whatever conditions you find yourself in, regardless of audience-platform.

According to Alejandro Russo; a good story is one that is concise and genuine… make it real and cut out the fat… people only care about genuine stuff and they don’t like to get bored… Try to condense the story into little time as possible and build on eliciting emotions.

According to Shane Snow; storytelling is about blending science and art; science is easy, it’s the technicality of how to publish, when, where, and in what form… The art of storytelling is tougher; it’s about consuming a lot of great stuff from disparate corners… Remember, though, that storytelling is not only about what you say, but also about what you do…

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In the article Art of Storytelling in Business by Milly Youngs writes: Storytelling in its simplest form is a connection of cause and effect. Narrative helps us make sense of the world around us. In fact, our conversations are dominated by stories: Researcher Jeremy Hsu found 65% of our conversations are made up of personal stories and gossip… The power of storytelling is something so many businesses fail to realize in marketing their brand and products. When information is communicated in story form, studies show people better relate and remember it.

Stories have the ability to spark emotions, whether it’s happiness, empathy, trust or anger. When listening to them not only are the language-processing parts of our brain activated, experiential parts of our brain come alive too… Brand storytelling isn’t new; companies have used advertising to evoke emotions through storytelling for years. However the landscape has changed, the digital revolution spurred new platforms, channels and devices through which to share and tell stories, opening up greater opportunities, but simultaneously greater challenges…

Here are a few tips for the art of storytelling in business: Above all, a good story is one that provokes an emotional reaction. Make the listener share the pains customers were experiencing, illustrate how the product or service will make their life less stressful, lovelier, more luxurious, and get this across through the story. Remember it’s all about them not you.

Understand target market-audience and engage with them as you would in real life; appeal to people’s lifestyles, problems, interests and needs… Make the stories easy to share across multiple channels, and good stories will speak for themselves… The stories need to give people a reason to come back… Meaningful, consistent content across multiple channels will give people a reason to return again and again…

In the article Business Storytelling Strengthen Presentation by Maggie Summers writes: Facts, data, statistics and quotes are essential parts of a business presentation, but their specific significance depends on the framework in which they are placed. We can spout off graph after graph and statistic after statistic but if we fail to provide context that data has little value. Facts have meaning when we ascribe meaning to them. Oblige the audience to connect with the presentation’s stats by fitting them into a business storyline that nuances and enhances the point…

The beauty of storytelling in business lies in ability to connect with others. Don’t underestimate the power of this modest device; it can compel the audience to trust you, it can encourage the audience to relate to you, and it can move the audience to take action... Even a boardroom full of serious, successful business people would rather listen to statistics and facts in the context of a fascinating story rather than listen to a colorless list of cumbersome facts…

According to Jerry Weissman; don’t make the audience think. Tie those prosaic facts into an engaging story to hammer home the main idea. Show audience why they should care; don’t leave them hunting for reasons.

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In the article Grow Business Through Storytelling by Robert Lerose writes: Story is a potent tool in business communication because it draws human attention. If you just tell me the business makes really great paper clips, I don’t care; it’s just data. But if you wrap the product up in a compelling narrative– an emotionally engrossing story– then you have me. A story not only gives me information that you guys make good paper clips, but it helps me feel an emotional connection with you and what you’re doing that’s really quite powerful…

Story touches nearly every aspect of our lives… Story by nature is a vehicle for a message, so it’s not artificial to graft business message onto business story… There’s a lot of research that shows how much better people remember things in story form– how much more convinced they are when people are given information in a story– rather than from a list of bullet points… According to Robert McKee; becoming a good storyteller is hard. It requires imagination and an understanding of what makes a story worth telling. All great stories deal with conflict between subjective expectations and an uncooperative objective reality. They show a protagonist wrestling with antagonizing forces, not a rosy picture of results meeting expectations…

However, good storytellers are not necessarily good leaders, but they do share certain traits; both are self-aware and both are skeptics who realize that all people and institutions–wear masks. Compelling stories can be found behind those masks…

In the article Importance of Storytelling in Business by Lewis Edward writes: When explaining how your business can help new customers, engaging them with a good story will prove much more advantageous than simply lecturing them on the benefits. There are a few things that you can do to make sure your stories are effective in helping business: Continuously collect new stories– you need to be able to share stories that connects to each of the customers’ individual personalities.

Even the best, most convincing story in the world won’t be able to reach everyone, so you must keep on collecting new stories. These can be from experiences in your own life or ones that you observe or hear from others, collecting stories keeps your repertoire fresh… Be specific (locations, numbers, facts…) when telling a story, you want to be as specific as possible in regards to the little facts…

All in all, being able to connect to potential customers in a personal and convincing manner is the key to increasing sales. Through storytelling you are able relate character to customer so they can get a deeper sense of how the business can benefit them. No matter how good the story is though, whatever you’re offering must be able to meet their expectations. Never lie or be dishonest in storytelling… offering quality products-service is the only way to get and keep happy customers…

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Stories are how we learn, best. We absorb numbers and facts and details, but we keep them all glued into our heads with stories… Stories let us convey wisdom, and/or explain information in an entertaining way… Leveraging the unparalleled, far-reaching power of storytelling is now the new doctrine in business… stories work in an unseen way to transform the way we absorb and process information…

It’s ironic that in the decade where we have access to more data than is humanly comprehensible, the vehicle that garners the most trust, confidence and belief is not a data point, but a story… Although the Internet has created an explosion of storytelling and content-sharing channels, the first priority is not about the channel, it’s about the story… Stories connect; transform; engage; they are the most important…

Business storytelling is a powerful enabler to cut through the clutter and engage the audience… According to Bill Baker; storytelling is a pull, not push, strategy; it’s about engagement-interaction… the audience is just as active participant as the storyteller… Storytelling is a selfless, empowering act– great storytelling points people toward a desired conclusion but gives them the freedom to draw that conclusion themselves… Storytelling draws from both magic and logic; truly great storytelling touches our hearts as well as our heads, getting us to feel, as well as to think.

Storytelling looks to the future: Successful storytelling respects the past and appreciates the present, but it also looks boldly into the future, moving people past ‘what is’ to ‘what if”… Done well, storytelling helps people collectively imagine a vision of the future that is achievable and worth achieving, helping them to understand not only what they’re working on, but also what they’re working toward…

As powerful as the story is, it still needs to convey the message; ‘I can solve your problem’… The overall goal isn’t to become the best storyteller in the world, but to grow the business: Develop a story that helps people connect the dots between ‘their problem’ and ‘your solution’…